Share

Immigration Laws Hamper Science and Economy, Issues Report Finds

ISSUES Fall 2014 Edition

Issues in Science and Technology is the award-winning journal of the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine, The University of Texas at Dallas and Arizona State University.

Cumbersome and outdated immigration rules are making it difficult for the United States to attract the talented people needed to drive an innovative economy, according to the researcher who wrote the cover report in the fall 2014 edition of Issues in Science and Technology.

Cutting-edge research and high-technology business have become global enterprises that rely heavily on an international talent pool of scientists and engineers, and an increasing number of countries are stepping up efforts to attract these people, writes Dr. Albert H. Teich, a research professor at George Washington University.

For many years the United States was the first choice for these talented individuals, and the country benefited enormously. According to Teich, roughly 40 percent of Fortune 500 firms — Google, Intel, Yahoo, eBay and Apple among them — were started by immigrants or their children. He recommends a number of immigration policy changes to ensure that the country remains a welcoming destination for top talent.

Also in the fall 2014 issue, Harvard economist Dr. Roland Fryer investigates the root causes of the disappointing academic performance of low-income and minority students. He identifies successful reforms developed in charter schools and shows how these practices can also be effective in all public schools.

Dr. Carl Mitcham of the Colorado School of Mines argues that because of the powerful effect that engineering has on many aspects of modern life, engineering education should include more courses in the humanities to help engineers better understand the implications of their work.

Several articles explore aspects of energy policy. Dr. John D. Graham, a former Office of Management and Budget official in the George W. Bush administration, and his current colleagues at Indiana University applaud the federal government’s effort to promote the development of electric vehicles and recommend that the initiative continue for several more years.

A group of experts from the Union of Concerned Scientists draws attention to the need for better information on the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing techniques used to extract oil and natural gas. Some renewable energy advocates have suggested that the Department of Defense could be a leader in developing this technology, but Dr. Eugene Gholz at The University of Texas at Austin argues that this strategy is unlikely to be effective.

Issues in Science and Technology is the award-winning journal of the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine, The University of Texas at Dallas and Arizona State University.  

Media Contact: The Office of Media Relations, UT Dallas, (972) 883-2155, [email protected].

Tagged: research