Accounting and Information Management


AIM 5300 Accounting and Information Management Internship (3 semester hours) This course provides students with an opportunity to expand and apply their skills in accounting and information management in a professional setting.  The accounting and information student will be required to apply knowledge obtained at the University in an actual job situation.  This course is designed for students who are engaged in a supervised internship that meets all of the necessary requirements set forth by Texas State Board of Public Accounting (3-0) S
AIM 6201 Financial Accounting (2 semester hours) This course explores the role of financial accounting information in the economy and explains how accounting information found in financial statements and annual reports is used in decision-making by investors, analysts, creditors and managers. (2-0) S
AIM 6202 Managerial Accounting (2 semester hours) This course presents a detailed study of how managerial accounting information supports the operational and strategic needs of the enterprise and how managers use accounting information for decision-making, learning, planning and controlling activities within organizations. (2-0) S
AIM 6305 Accounting for Managers (3 semester hours) Fundamental concepts in financial and managerial accounting are presented from the perspective of business managers.  In the financial accounting part, students develop skills in reading and using information provided in financial statements.  In the managerial accounting part, students learn accounting techniques used by managers in planning, directing, controlling, and other decision-making activities.  This course is available only to students in the UT Telecampus MBA Program.  May not be substituted for AIM 6201 or AIM 6202  (3-0) S
AIM 6330 Intermediate Financial Accounting I (3 semester hours) A study of external financial reporting, including measurement and reporting of cash, receivables, inventories, property, plant, and equipment, and intangibles.  Financial statement presentation issues are analyzed to gain an appreciation for the impact of generally accepted accounting principles on business decisionsStudents who have taken AIM 3331) or its equivalent may not take AIM 6330 for credit. Prerequisite: AIM 6201 or equivalent  (3-0) S
AIM 6332 Intermediate Financial Accounting II (3 semester hours) A continuation of topics in external financial reporting including accounting for debt, leases, deferred taxes, pensions, stock-based compensation plans, equity, earnings per share, accounting changes and cash flows.  Currently generally accepted accounting principles for financial reporting are analyzed as is their effect on the financial results of companies. Students who have taken AIM 3332 or its equivalent may not take AIM 6332 for credit. Prerequisite: AIM 6330 or equivalent. (3-0) S
AIM 6333 Advanced Financial Reporting (3 semester hours) The application of generally accepted accounting principles in complex settings is studied. Topics include accounting for business combinations, consolidated entities, companies in financial difficulty, state and local governments, not-for-profit organizations, and global operations including foreign currency conversion and translation of financial statements reported in foreign currency. Prerequisite: AIM 6332 or instructor consent. (3-0) Y
AIM 6334 Auditing (3 semester hours) Basic concepts, philosophy, standards, procedures, and practices of auditing are presented. Topics include generally accepted auditing standards, the changing role of the independent auditor in society, professional conduct and ethics, the auditor’s reporting responsibilities, risk assessment, internal control, evidential matter, and management fraud. Prerequisites: AIM 6330 or equivalent. (3-0) S
AIM 6335 Ethics for Professional Accountants (3 semester hours) Ethical reasoning, integrity, objectivity, independence and other core values as defined by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants are presented. (3-0) Y
AIM 6336 Information Technology Audit and Risk Management (3 semester hours) Management’s role in designing and controlling information technology used to process accounting data is studied. Topics include the role of internal and external auditors in systems development, information security, business continuity, information technology, operations, and the assurance of information related to on-line systems, web-based, internet, and other advanced computer systems. (3-0) Y
AIM 6337 Data Management  (3 semester hours) Database theory and tools used to manage accounting data and other information are introduced.  Topics include relational database theories, Structured Query Language (SQL), database design and conceptual/semantic data modeling.  A client/server database environment is developed with a selected SQL server and a database application development tool.  May not receive credit for both AIM 6337 and MIS 6326.  (3-0) Y
AIM 6338 Integrated Accounting Information Systems Analysis and Design (3 semester hours) Using SAP or similar software, this course focuses on accounting information systems as part of integrated enterprise systems and modern systems analysis and design of integrated accounting systems.  Emphasis will be on integrated business processes and related financial transaction flows, system analysis and design methods in SAP with focus on configuration methods. (3-0) Y
AIM 6339 Financial Reporting using XBRL and XML (3 semester hours) Using case studies reflecting different ways of collecting and analyzing financial and managerial  information,  students are introduced to enterprise software, financial reporting using XBRL, XML,  and the importance of multiple views of accounting data for decision-making.  Relevant e-business aspects will be covered. (3-0) R
AIM 6340 Information Technology Project Management  (3 semester hours) This course addresses project management issues related to information technology projects.  Topics include software life cycle models, project planning and control, software development and maintenance, risk management,  cost estimation models, software productivity and quality metrics, outsourcing and conventional and emerging software technologies. (3-0) R
AIM 6341 Planning, Control and Performance Evaluation (3 semester hours) The application of management accounting for planning, control and performance evaluation is studied for business and not-for-profit organizations. Topics include planning, budgeting, performance evaluation, centers of responsibility, modern control methods, management compensation, and transfer pricing. Extensive use cases are adhered to. Prerequisite: AIM 6202 or instructor consent. (3-0) Y
AIM 6342 Strategic Cost Management (3 semester hours) Cost analysis is integrated with strategic analysis to understand the role of financial and non-financial information in operational and strategic decision-making. Topics include strategic value chain analysis, strategic positioning analysis, activity based management, line of business evaluation, life cycle costing, technology costing, target costing, quality cost management and balanced scorecard. Prerequisite: AIM 6202 or equivalent. (3-0) Y
AIM 6343 Accounting Information Systems (3 semester hours) Managing the design, control and operation of accounting information systems in a computerized organizational environment is studied. The emphasis is on identifying the information needs of decision makers and developing appropriate business process control in the design of accounting information systems. (3-0) R
AIM 6344 Financial Statement Analysis (3 semester hours)  Analysis of financial statements for evaluating firm performance and risk. Topics include interpretation of  financial statements and footnotes, managers’ incentives for earnings manipulation, comparative analysis of firms, and ethics in financial reporting. Prerequisite: AIM 6201 or equivalent. (3-0) S
AIM 6345 Business Valuation (3 semester hours) Financial statement based valuation models are studied. Topics include earnings management, income measurement and profitability assessment, discounted cash flow, and accounting-based valuation models. Prerequisite: AIM 6201 and AIM 6202 or instructor consent. (3-0) Y
AIM 6346 Financial Dimensions of Mergers and Acquisitions (3 semester hours) The application of financial statement based information is examined for merger and acquisition activities. Topics include financial measures for identifying acquisition targets and/or leveraged buy-out targets, the impact of acquisition on performance measures, valuing the targets and structuring deals. Prerequisite: AIM 6201 and AIM 6202 or instructor consent. (3-0) Y
AIM 6347 Current Topics in Advanced Cost Management (3 semester hours) Analysis of costs, benefits and risks to facilitate evaluation of information systems and technology.  Topics include evaluation of technology investments, recall decisions, accounting for software development costs, quantifying benefits related to enterprise resource planning systems and supply chain management systems and high quality cost management systems, valuation of entrepreneurial firms,  and real options analysis. Prerequisite AIM 6202 (3-0) Y
AIM 6349 Corporate Information Technology Strategy and Management (3 semester hours) Issues of strategic planning and control related to information technology and e-commerce are discussed based on contemporary case studies. Topics include strategic scenario planning for e-commerce infrastructure, developing business cases for information technology investment and valuation, and implementing the balanced scorecard for IT project management. May not receive credit for both AIM 6349 and MIS 6302.  (3-0) Y
AIM 6351 Individual Taxation (3 semester hours) Taxation principles and concepts for individual income are studied. (3-0) S
AIM 6352 Corporate Taxation (3 semester hours) Income taxes on corporations and associations, reorganizations, and corporate distributions are examined. The role of taxes in business decisions and business strategy is emphasized. Prerequisite: AIM 6351 or equivalent. (3-0) S
AIM 6354 Partnership Taxation (3 semester hours) The tax law is studied as it relates to the formation of a partnership, the determination of the taxable income of the partnership and the distributive shares of the partners, the tax consequences of distributions by a partnership and of transfers of interests in a partnership. Prerequisite: AIM 6351 or equivalent, and AIM 6356 (3-0) S
AIM 6356 Tax Research (3 semester hours) Identification and evaluation of legal authorities applicable to tax issues for individual and business taxpayers are studied. Application of research in tax planning and administrative procedures in a tax practice, emphasizing the structure of the Internal Revenue Service and its impact on a tax practitioner. Prerequisite: AIM 6351 or equivalent. (3-0) S
AIM 6357 Federal Gift and Estate Taxation (3 semester hours) Federal tax laws applicable to the taxes imposed on property transfers by lifetime giving and bequests upon death are surveyed. Topics include the valuation of property for transfer tax purposes, properties included in a deceased person’s estate, deductions allowable on the estate tax return, and exclusions from taxation. Prerequisite: AIM 6351 or equivalent, and AIM 6356 (3-0) R
AIM 6362 International Accounting (3 semester hours) Measurement and reporting problems and accounting functions and activities in various international environments are evaluated using country and case studies. Accounting concepts, standards, methods and practices in foreign countries and their relationship to US accounting are examined. Topics include foreign currency translation, taxation, performance measurement of international entities, accounting for international operations, comparative accounting systems, transfer pricing and financial reporting of foreign and multinational corporations. Prerequisite: AIM 6201 or equivalent or instructor consent. (3-0) Y
AIM 6365 Governmental and Not-For-Profit Accounting (3 semester hours) Accounting practices for governmental and not-for-profit organizations are studied, including accounting requirements for institutions, municipalities, and state and federal government. Topics include performance budgeting, systems analysis, and accounting implications of economic decisions. Prerequisite: AIM 6201 and AIM 6202 or instructor consent. (3-0)R
AIM 6370 Business Law (3 semester hours) Laws affecting business organizations and laws influencing managerial decision-making are examined. Topics include contract law, law of agency, law of commercial transactions, and the uniform commercial code and the laws relating to the formation and operation of corporations (3-0) Y
AIM 6377 Corporate Governance and Accounting (3 semester hours) This course views Corporate Governance as a structured system of policies and processes established and maintained by a board of directors to oversee an organization’s strategic activities and resulting performance.  The system is in place to ensure proper accountability, probity and openness in the conduct of an organization’s business for the long-term benefit of its shareholders.  As such, Corporate Governance focuses on and effectuates the relationships among a company’s board of directors, top management, investors (particularly institutional investors), and other stakeholders. To enhance understanding, this course has two themes: first, issues are addressed academically; second, issues are addressed through the presentations by 12 prominent and knowledgeable speakers involved in various aspects of Corporate Governance.  Prerequisite:  AIM 6201 and AIM 6202 or equivalent (3-0) S.   

AIM 6378 Enterprise Systems and CRM (3 semester hours) The objective of the course is to increase practical skills and conceptual knowledge related to Customer Relationship Management (CRM) utilizing the mySAP.com  CRM application as the primary learning tool.  Students will garner knowledge of operational, analytical, and collaborative CRM.  (3-0) R

AIM 6379 ABAP Programming (3 semester hours) This course provides a thorough understanding of the role of ABAP programming, SAP’s programming language, in the implementation and use of enterprise systems.  Focus of the course will include complex report development, SAP query, dialog programming, ASAP Objects, transaction development, EDI/ALE and BAPI development, Business Add-ins(BADIs) and output processing.  (3-0) R

 

AIM 6380 Internal Audit (3 semester hours) The course covers internal audit from a broad perspective that includes information technology, business processes, and accounting systems.  Topics include internal auditing standards, risk assessment, governance, ethics, audit techniques, and emerging issues.  This is the first course leading to Endorsed Internal Audit Certificate and will prepare students to sit for the Certified Internal Auditor Exam. (3-0) Y
AIM 6382 Advanced Auditing (3 semester hours) This course examines how the role of internal and external audit can best be coordinated.  Numerous case studies of audit integrated activities will be covered.  Current topics and issues related to audit will be discussed as part of the class.  Prerequisite: AIM 6334 and AIM 6380 or equivalents. (3-0) R

AIM 6383 Forensic Accounting Investigations (3 semester hours) This course will include a review of techniques used in solving financial crimes including: interviewing techniques, rules of evidence, sources of information, forensic accounting procedures and current issues in financial investigations.  The course will include the criminal statutes related to financial crimes.  Case studies will be used to discuss interviewing techniques and other indirect methods of proof in resolving financial crimes.  Various financial documents and instruments will be discussed and reviewed as part of the documentary evidence to support financial investigations.  (3-0) Y

AIM 6384 Analytical Reviews using Audit Software (3 semester hours) This course will introduce students to the theory and tools used to leverage automated auditing software, such as ACL and IDEA.  It will include an analytical review of accounting and operational data for Internal Auditors.  The course includes hands-on use of audit software and the development of an audit dashboard.  The course will also explore ways to leverage the enterprise technology and use available technology to monitor controls and detect fraud.  (3-0) R

AIM 6390 Professional Accounting (3 semester hours) This course is designed to help students prepare for careers in professional accounting and professional examinations.  (3-0) R

 

 

AIM 7313 Contemporary Research in Accounting and Economics  (3 semester hours) Presents current areas of research in accounting economics. Emphasis is ongoing and recently completed research studies, including understanding of their antecedents and research methodologies. Format includes presentations by doctoral students, faculty and visiting speakers. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. (3-0) T
AIM 7314 Contemporary Research in Information Management (3 semester hours) Presents current areas of research in information management. Emphasis is ongoing and recently completed research studies, including understanding of their antecedents and research methodologies. Format includes presentations by doctoral students, faculty and visiting speakers. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. (3-0) T
AIM 7323 Empirical Research in Accounting and Economics (3 semester hours) Presents a detailed study of past and current empirical research in accounting. Emphasis is on a clear understanding of hypothesis formulation, research design, sample selection and statistical techniques used in these studies. Topics include the role of information for valuation, contracting, and performance evaluation, and analysis of financial and non-financial performance measurement. (3-0) T
AIM 7324 Empirical Research in Information Management (3 semester hours) Presents a detailed study of past and current empirical research in information management. Emphasis is on a clear understanding of hypothesis formulation, research design, sample selection and statistical techniques used in these studies. Topics include the role of information for, contracting and performance evaluation; analysis of cost, productivity and other  performance measures, market structure in e-commerce and software management. (3-0) T       
AIM 7333 Analytical Research in Accounting and Economics (3 semester hours) Presents a detailed study of economics based analytical research in accounting. Emphasis is on a clear understanding of theoretical paradigms, modeling issues, interpretation of the results, and empirical applications of analytical models. Topics will include the role of information for valuation, contracting, and performance evaluation, and analysis of financial and non-financial performance measurement. (3-0) T
AIM 7334 Analytical Research in Information Management (3 semester hours) Presents a detailed study of economics based research in information intensive organizations. Emphasis is on providing an understanding of the economic theory underlying the role of information in e-commerce settings, market structure evolution and decision-making, together with related empirical applications. Topics will include pricing and revenue models, supply chain economics, time-based financial models and quality of service. (3-0) T
AIM 7343 Analytical Research in Finance and Accounting (3 semester hours) Presents a detailed study of analytical research of capital markets. Emphasis in on providing an understanding of the theory underlying valuation and corporate governance, together with applications in accounting and finance. Topics will include valuation, signaling, disclosure and rational expectation equilibrium. (3-0) T
AIM 7344 Empirical research in Finance and Accounting (3 semester hours) Presents a detailed study of empirical research of capital markets. Emphasis in on providing an understanding of the theory underlying valuation and corporate governance, together with applications in accounting and finance. Topics will include valuation, signaling, disclosure and rational expectation equilibrium. (3-0) T  

Business Policy and Strategy


BPS 6201 The Environment of Business (2 semester hours) An examination of the relationship between the management of micro-organizational units (corporations, non-business entities, and government agencies) and the larger social environment of which they are a part. (2-0) S
BPS 6305 Ethical Issues in International Business (3 semester hours) Examines ethical concepts such as justice, equality, freedom, and responsibility as they relate to the functioning of an economic system. Specific problems facing the global business organization will be discussed from an ethical perspective. Articulation of management philosophy incorporating the ethical dimension. (3-0) S


BPS 6260 Readings in Management (2 semester hours) Examination of the development of management thought and practice as business developed into a major institution in our society. Readings in management thought assignments to accomplish this purpose. Each student is expected to develop his/her own written philosophy of management as a major objective of the course. Prerequisite: BPS 6210 or BPS 6310. (2-0) T
BPS 6310 Strategic Management (3 semester hours) Strategic management consists of the analysis, decisions, and actions that organizations take to create sustainable competitive advantages. The course examines a variety of issues including environmental, competitor, and stakeholder analysis; strategy formulation; and strategy implementation and control.  The central role of ethics and corporate governance as well as global issues will be addressed.  Prerequisites: OB 6301, MKT 6301, AIM 6201, AIM 6202, FIN 6301 or consent of the instructor. (3-0) S
BPS 6311 Strategy Implementation (3 semester hours) Implementation issues of strategic planning. Topics include: planning system design, organizing for planning, situation analysis, and corporate/divisional relationships. Cases and selected readings illustrate the key planning concepts. Prerequisite: BPS 6210 or BPS 6310 or consent of instructor. (3-0) Y
BPS 6312 Advanced Multinational Business Seminar (3 semester hours) This seminar aims at the broadening of business strategy horizons to include the international dimension applied to topical business problems. It also responds to the recent findings of the US Management schools that precepts of corporate strategy for national markets are subject to many exceptions and require much supplementation when applied to multinational markets. This course also aims at providing support for the Dallas Metroplex area business organizations for designing and implementing their strategies in general, multinational strategies in particular. This course will investigate topical and sector-based implementation problems derived from the participants’ own companies or current business media (3-0) T
BPS 6320 Government Regulation of Business (3 semester hours) Impact of U.S. federal and state agencies on business as well as international legal issues. Emphasis is on a strategic approach to the principle regulatory issues facing business today. (3-0) Y
BPS 6332 Strategic Leadership (3 semester hours) Addresses the challenge of leading organizations in dynamic and challenging environments. Overall goal is to not only question one’s assumptions about leadership, but also enhance skills and acquire new content knowledge. Topics include visionary and transformational leadership; post-heroic leadership; empowerment; leveraging and combining resources; designing organizations; and ethics.(3-0)Y
BPS 6340 Accountability and Ethics in Corporate Governance (3 semester hours) This course addresses the issues faced by top management teams and boards of directors, including compensation, investor relations, social responsibility, and accountability in the context of ethical strategic policy making. (3-0) S
BPS 6350 Enterprise Transformation Management (3 semester hours)  This course is designed to provide an overview of the key concepts that comprise enterprise transformation, specifically corporate-wide resource allocation and reallocation—relating and combining corporate strategy, business structure, and management systems within a general change-management framework.  The roles of leadership, communication, team-building, and performance measurement are highlighted as they accelerate and sustain large-scale, complex transformation programs in global industries.  (3-0)  T


BPS 6360 Management and Organizational Consulting: theory and practice (3 semester hours) Management Consulting now accounts for more than $120 billion in global annual revenues.  In addition to these full-time consultants, more and more employees are also in roles of a consultative nature, as the knowledge-intensive nature of work increases. This course will begin with a review of the theoretical foundations of the client-consultant relationship, drawing from counseling psychology and other disciplines, then, broaden to cover theories of Organizational Behavior, Organizational Learning and Strategy. Through various workshops and hands-on exercises, participants will apply these theories in a number of scenarios relevant for consulting. Special attention will be given to prepare students to become confident practitioners, by bridging the theory-practice gap in the practice of management and organizational consulting.

Prerequisite: OB 6301 (3 - 0) T

 

BPS 6385 Entrepreneurial Business Strategies (3 semester hours) Focuses on successful business strategies for entrepreneurial firms attempting entry into established or emerging industries. Topics include the formulation and evaluation of strategy in emerging industries, including an introduction to models of technological evolution, new firm strategy development, and organizational dynamics and innovation. The course also addresses the innovation process, appropriation of economic value from innovation, competition between technologies, strategies for competing against established incumbents, management of innovation and theories of diffusion and adoption. The course will make extensive use of case studies and visiting lectures by entrepreneurs. This course is equivalent to ENTP 6385 and only one of these may count toward a degree.  Prerequisites: BPS 6370 and BPS 6310 or permission of the instructor. (3-0) Y
BPS 7300 Strategic Management (3 semester hours) Major theories and current research addressing strategy formulation and implementation. Prerequisite: OB 7300. (3-0) T  

Innovation and Entrepreneurship

ENTP 6360 Entrepreneurial Ventures (3 semester hours) This course is designed to provide an introduction to entrepreneurship for non-management students. The course emphasizes the development of technology-based ventures, addressing opportunity identification and evaluation, market assessment, startup strategies, business valuation, business plan development, venture financing, and startup management. Guest lectures by practicing entrepreneurs and investors provide a real-world perspective. The major deliverable of this course is an early stage feasibility analysis of a venture of the student’s choosing. This course is not available to students enrolled in degree programs in the School of Management. (3-0) S

 

ENTP 6370 Entrepreneurship (3 semester hours) This course provides an introduction to entrepreneurship, with an emphasis on identifying, evaluating and developing new venture opportunities. Topics include opportunity identification and evaluation, startup strategies, business valuation, business plan development, attracting stakeholders, financing the venture, managing the growing business and exit strategies. Case studies and guest lectures by entrepreneurs and venture capital partners provide a real-world perspective. The major deliverable of this course is an early stage feasibility analysis of a venture of the student’s choosing. Prerequisites: AIM 6201 or consent of the instructor. (3-0) S

 

ENTP 6375 Strategic and Organizational Issues in Technology Management (3 semester hours) This course addresses the strategic and organizational issues confronted by firms in technology-intensive environments. The course reflects five broad themes: (1) managing firms in technology-intensive industries; (2) linking technology and business strategies; (3) using technology as a source of competitive advantage; (4) organizing firms to achieve these goals; and (5) implementing new technologies in organizations. Students will analyze actual situations in organizations and summarize their findings and recommendations in an in-depth term paper. Case studies and class participation are stressed. Prerequisites: (a) AIM 6201 and OB 6301 or consent of the instructor, or (b) ENTP 6360 for students not enrolled in the School of Management. (3-0) T

 

ENTP 6378 Managing the Emerging Enterprise (3 semester hours)  The course focuses on the challenges of growing a small company from early startup to a professionally managed business, as the entrepreneur struggles to maintain the entrepreneurial spirit of the firm while introducing the professional management disciplines essential to sustained and profitable growth. Topics include shaping and communicating the entrepreneur’s vision, developing a viable business model, positioning products and services in a broader market, implementing business strategies, building an organization and infrastructure, molding the culture, developing and managing critical relationships with banks, suppliers and customers, and managing growth with limited resources. The course makes extensive use of case studies and visiting lectures by entrepreneurs. Prerequisite: (a) ENTP 6370 or consent of the instructor, or (b) ENTP 6360 for students not enrolled in the School of Management. (3-0) Y

 

ENTP 6315 Entrepreneurial Finance (3 semester hours) The objective of this course is to build skills and knowledge in the financing of entrepreneurial ventures. Entrepreneurial Finance concerns not only the processes of financing and investing in start-up companies, but also the changes to the initial financing mix that may be required as start-up companies mature and grow. Topics include the market for venture capital and private equity, the decision to go public or remain private, alternative financing arrangements, and the differential marketability and liquidity of the securities used to finance non-public firms. The course is equivalent to FIN 6315 and only one of these may be counted toward a degree.   Prerequisite: FIN 6301 or consent of the instructor. (3-0) Y

 

ENTP 6380 Entrepreneurial Marketing (3 semester hours) This course addresses the marketing challenges facing the entrepreneurial firm, including the introduction and marketing of new products and services without the benefit of an established reputation, channel infrastructure or customer base. Topics include the development of marketing strategies, channel selection and design, product positioning, competitive pricing strategies, advertising and promotion, etc., all within the framework of the resource limitations inherent in an entrepreneurial startup. This course is equivalent to MKT 6380 and only one of these may be counted toward a degree.  Prerequisites: (a) MKT 6301 and ENTP 6370 or consent of the instructor, or (b) ENTP 6360 for students not enrolled in the School of Management. (3-0) Y

 

ENTP 6385 Entrepreneurial Business Strategies (3 semester hours) This course is an advanced course in strategic management, with an emphasis on business strategies for entrepreneurial firms. Within this framework, the course addresses the most recent approaches and perspectives on strategic management in rapidly changing environments. Topics include the formulation and evaluation of strategy in emerging industries, strategies for market entry and competition against established incumbents, the role of technology standards, the technology adoption life cycle model, theories of disruptive innovation, and the use of creative imitation, speed and agility to prevail over established competitors. This course is equivalent to BPS 6385 and only one of these may be counted toward a degree.  Prerequisites: (a) ENTP 6370 and BPS 6310 or consent of the instructor, or (b) ENTP 6360 for students not enrolled in the School of Management. (3-0) Y

 

ENTP 6388 Creating and Managing Ventures within the Corporation (3 semester hours)  Intrapreneurs are the entrepreneurs within established corporations who combine innovation, creativity and leadership to develop and launch new products, new product lines and new business units that grow revenues and profits from within. The course seeks to equip students with the skills and perspectives required to initiate new ventures and create viable businesses in dynamic and uncertain environments in the face of organizational inertia and other sources of resistance to innovation. Course topics include the elements of strategic analysis and positioning for competitive advantage in dynamic markets, and the structuring, utilization and mobilization of the internal resources of existing firms in the pursuit of growth and new market opportunities. Prerequisites: (a) AIM 6201and OB 6301 or consent of the instructor, or (b) ENTP 6360 for students not enrolled in the School of Management. (3-0) T

 

ENTP 6390 Business Plan Development (3 semester hours) This course is designed for students who desire to pursue the development of a comprehensive business plan for an entrepreneurial new business concept. The course will be structured in a workshop format consisting of lectures, developmental exercises and group presentations of the new business idea, researching, developing and refining the new business concept under the guidance of a faculty mentor. Enrollment will be limited to groups of students with a pre-approved new business idea. Prerequisite: (a) ENTP 6370 and consent of the instructor, or (b) ENTP 6360 for students not enrolled in the School of Management and consent of the instructor. (3-0) R

 

ENTP 6395 Seminar – Topics in Innovation and Entrepreneurship (3 semester hours)  This course will explore special topics of interest to students of Innovation and Entrepreneurship. The content will vary, exploring such topics as opportunities for innovation in Biotechnology, Information Technology, Nanotechnology and other fields. Extensive use of outside speakers, special readings, and field and library research will be involved. Prerequisites: (a) ENTP 6370 and consent of instructor, or (b) ENTP 6360 for students not enrolled in the School of Management and consent of the instructor. (3-0) Y

 

ENTP 6398 The Entrepreneurial Experience (3 semester hours) This course will provide individuals or teams of students the opportunity to earn course credit while gaining actual work experience in entrepreneurial firms. Marketing, strategy or operations research projects will be developed jointly by faculty and the entrepreneurial firm, and made available to students as an opportunity to gain practical experience in an entrepreneurial organization. Evaluation will be based on a term paper or other major deliverable negotiated on a case by case basis. Prerequisites: (a) ENTP 6370 and consent of instructor, or (b) ENTP 6360 for students not enrolled in the School of Management and consent of instructor. (3-0), R.

 

 

Finance


FIN 6301 Financial Management (3 semester hours) Theoretical and procedural considerations in the administration of the finance function in the individual business firm; planning, fundraising, controlling of firm finances; working capital management, capital budgeting and cost of capital. Corequisites: STAT 5311 or OPRE 6301and AIM 6201, or consent of instructor. (3-0) S
FIN 6305 Corporate Finance and Policy (3 semester hours) Cases involving financial situations encountered in general management and financial management. Special emphasis is placed on strategy. Prerequisites: FIN 6301 and MECO 6201 or MECO 6303. (3-0) Y
FIN 6310 Investment Management (3 semester hours) The course examines a range of issues concerning the management of investment portfolios. The course objective course is to provide an understanding of the role of modern financial theory in portfolio management and to present a framework for addressing current issues in the management of financial assets. The concepts and techniques examined are also useful in financial planning and personal investment decisions. Topics to be covered during the semester include trading, valuation, active portfolio management, asset allocation, global diversification, performance measurement, financial derivatives, and fixed income securities.Theoretical and practical approaches to investment management. Topics include: the theory of the consumption-investment decision; the sources and uses of financial information in investment decisions; the role and function of the security analyst; and the theoretical and applied approaches to efficient portfolio management. Prerequisites: FIN 6301, MECO 6201 or MECO 6303, and STAT 5311 or OPRE 6301. (3-0) Y
FIN 6312 Portfolio Management (3 semester hours) This course builds on the basic ideas underlying portfolio optimization covered in FIN 6301 and FIN 6310. It emphasizes the application of modern portfolio theory using quantitative methods. Spreadsheet analysis and statistical concepts play a key role in the practical examples used to illustrate theoretical models and methods. At the completion of this course, students will be able to analyze market data using the latest investment management tools, to formulate theoretical models, and to implement appropriate investment strategies. Students who are interested in obtaining a qualification such as the CFA or CFP will find this course useful in achieving this goal. Prerequisite: FIN 6310. (3-0) T
FIN 6315 Entrepreneurial  Finance (3 semester hours)  The objective of this course is to build skills and knowledge in the financing of entrepreneurial ventures.  Entrepreneurial Finance concerns not only the process of financing and investing in start-up companies, but also the changes to the initial financing mix that may be required as start-up companies mature and grow.  Topics include the markets for venture capital and private equity, the decision to go public or remain private, alternative financing arrangements, and the differential marketability and liquidity of the securities used to finance non-public firms. This course is equivalent to ENTP 6315 and only one of these may be counted toward a degree.  Prerequisite:   FIN 6301.  (3-0) T
FIN 6320 Money and Capital Markets (3 semester hours) Financial behavior in relation to production and consumption decisions. Banking, financial intermediation, flows of funds, regulation and structure of financial markets. Selected topics of current interest. Prerequisites: FIN 6301, MECO 6201 or MECO 6303 and STAT 5311 or OPRE 6301. (3-0) Y
FIN 6350 Advanced Financial Management (3 semester hours) Advanced analysis of topics in financial management. Capital structure, dividend policy, incentives, and risk management. Prerequisites: FIN 6301, MECO 6201 or MECO 6303 and FIN 6310, or consent of instructor. (3-0) T
FIN 6360 Options and Futures Markets (3 semester hours) Examines the valuation of derivative securities such as options and futures contracts, as well as the use of these instruments in managing business and financial risks. The topics to be covered include pricing of futures contracts, swaps, and options, the use of derivative instruments in hedging, portfolio insurance, exotic options, and the valuation of options on debt instruments. Prerequisites: FIN 6310 and MECO 6201 or MECO 6303. (3-0) T
FIN 6366 International Financial Management (3 semester hours) Study of world financial markets and institutions, foreign exchange exposure and management, foreign direct investment, and a variety of issues involved in the financial management of multinational firms. May not also receive credit for IMS 6220. Prerequisite: FIN 6301. (3-0) T


FIN 6370 The Theory of Finance and Its Applications  (3 semester hours) A survey of financial theories and their application to various financial decisions and issues.  Topics will include the theory of portfolio choices, asset pricing, derivative pricing, asymmetric information theories, and firm financing issues. Prerequisite:  FIN 6301, FIN 6310 or FIN6350, or permission of instructor.  (3 - 0) T

 

 

FIN 6375 Finance Workshop (3 semester hours) Forum for faculty and students to present recent developments in the finance literature. Presentation and discussion of published and unpublished papers of researchers with various affiliations. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (May be repeated for credit.) (3-0) T
FIN 7310 Seminar in Contemporary Finance (3 semester hours) Issues in current financial research. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (May be repeated for credit.) (3-0) T
FIN 7330 Asset Pricing Theory (3 semester hours) Advanced studies in the theory of asset pricing. Provides a foundation for advanced research in financial theory and empirical tests of asset pricing models.  The prerequisites are advanced calculus and MECO 6345, or an equivalent doctoral level course in microeconomics.  Topics include utility theory, mean-variance portfolio analysis, state preference models, continuous time portfolio selection, and the term structure of interest rates. (3-0) T
FIN 7340 Theory of Corporate Finance (3 semester hours)Advanced empirical and theoretical analysis of corporate financial decision making.  The prerequisites are advanced calculus and MECO 6345, or an equivalent doctoral level course in microeconomics.  Topics include the theory of the firm, initial public offerings, ownership and control, managerial incentives, risk management, and financing and investment decisions. (3-0) T  

Healthcare Administration

 

HMGT 6320 The American Healthcare System (3 semester hours)  Explores the structure and political economy of the US health system.  Topics include the economics of cost, quality and access to healthcare, the impact of regulation on health care delivery and analysis of recent proposals for health care reform.  This course could serve as an introduction for healthcare majors.  (3 - 0) T

 

HMGT 6321 Strategic Management of Healthcare Organizations (3 semester hours)

Explores how healthcare organizations can create sustainable competitive advantage in a volatile, reimbursement driven industry.  Topics include external and internal environmental analysis, strategy formulation, organizational design and control and the impact of mergers and alliances on industry performance.  Healthcare case studies are used to illustrate key concepts.  Prerequisite: HMGT 6320. (3 - 0) T

 

HMGT 6322 Healthcare Cost Management and Control (3 semester hours)  Examines how healthcare organizations allocate and report costs and use that information for managerial decision-making.  Additional topics include how activity based costing can be used to more accurately determine the true cost of medical services and the use of the balanced scorecard to manage the conflicting imperatives of controlling costs and improving care.  Prerequisite: HMGT 6320 and either AIM 6201 or AIM 6202.   (3 - 0) T

 

HMGT 6323 Healthcare Informatics (3 semester hours) Examines the unique challenges of clinical and service process improvement in the healthcare industry, including the role of data management and information technology in improving healthcare delivery.   Prerequisite: HMGT 6320 and MIS 6204 or equivalent.  (3 - 0) T

 

HMGT 6324 Healthcare Negotiation and Dispute Resolution (3 semester hours)

Examines and analyzes the significant issues related to negotiation and conflict management in the healthcare industry. Students critique and discuss these issues from the perspectives of major healthcare stakeholders.  Exercises and simulations reinforce theories about the role of negotiations and dispute resolution in effective management. Prerequisite: HMGT 6320.  (3 - 0) T

 

HMGT 6329 Special Topics in Healthcare Management (3 semester hours)

This course examines several important structural, political and regulatory issues in healthcare.  Facilitated by outside industry experts, topics might include: healthcare reform, consumer directed healthcare, the future of Medicare and Medicaid, medical ethics, health plan economics, the impact of hospital and MCO consolidation, HIPPA regulation, and measuring quality in healthcare.  Prerequisite: HMGT 6320.  (3 - 0) R



International Management Studies


IMS 5200 Global Business (2 semester hours) Provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of international business, covering macro-level environmental factors that affect international businesses today. Topics include globalization, country environments, culture, international trade and investment, regional economic integration, and the global monetary system. (2-0) S
IMS 6202 International Business Transactions (2 semester hours) The legal environment and framework of international business, legal aspects and implications of international trade and the establishment and operation of business abroad, moving goods across national borders, immigration, joint ventures, licensing, setting up and financing operations abroad, negotiating an international deal, resolving disputes, international corruption, bribery and crime. Prerequisite: IMS 5200. (2-0) T

IMS 6220 International Corporate Finance (2 semester hours) Financial policies and practices of companies involved in multinational operations. The course considers management of working capital and permanent assets. Investment practices and capital budgeting for the global firm. May not also receive credit for FIN 6366. Prerequisites: IMS 5200 and FIN 6301, or consent of instructor. (2-0) Y
IMS 6300 The Multinational Firm (3 semester hours) Examines how multinational firms adapt to the international environment. Topics include the management of human resources, finance and the supply chain within the multinational firm. Special attention is given to the strategy and structure of multinational operations. Prerequisite: IMS 5200. (2-0) Y
IMS 6310 International Marketing (3 semester hours) This course aims at preparing students to appreciate the international marketing by understanding both theoretical and practical issues involved. This course covers the fundamentals and evolution of international marketing, the environment of international marketing, foreign entry methods, evaluation of market potential, management of international marketing mix , consumer behavior and international strategic marketing planning. Students will also learn the reasons why international marketing is important for success in international business and for finding personal career opportunities. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or consent of instructor. (3-0) Y


IMS 6312 International Advertising (3 semester hours) This course will aim at preparing the students to understand theoretical and practical aspects of international advertising within the context of global marketing communications. The basic principles of the course will include global versus local creative strategies and executions, international media opportunities, and global research methods. It will aim to equip the students with an understanding of the basic principles of advertising, including the various and differing cultural, economic and political factors that impact international marketing communications with a view to get employment in international advertising. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or consent of instructor. (3 - 0) T

 

IMS 6314 Global E-business Marketing (3 semester hours) This course aims at preparing the students for managing global e-business activities within the framework of accelerated trends for globalization. International aspects of E-business have become more important due to the variables in legal and regulatory regimes, the state of the communications infrastructure and differences in culture; including language and perception of the benefits of the Internet. Students will be prepared to understand the worldwide unevenness in the adoption and use of E-business globally and develop ability to customize and personalize the Internet experience to use at their employment in the field. Prerequisites: MKT 6301 or consent of instructor. (3 - 0) T

 

IMS 6360 International Strategic Management (3 semester hours) This course examines the strategic challenges that multinational firms face. Issues such as managing across national boundaries, responding to environmental challenges, managing international joint ventures and strategic alliances, managing headquarters-subsidiary relationships, and developing global capabilities will be discussed. Prerequisite: IMS 5200 (3-0) Y
IMS 6365 Cross-Cultural Communication and Management (3 semester hours) This course focuses on understanding national culture and cultural issues in international business. It emphasizes the importance of managing cultural differences to enhance communication, negotiation, leadership, and group dynamics in an international work environment. Further, the course describes methods to develop effective selection and training programs for international assignments. (3-0) Y
IMS 7300 International Management (3 semester hours) Current theory and research on international management, multinational corporations, and government policies affecting international business. Prerequisite: admission to OSIM Ph.D. program or consent of instructor.(3-0) Y  

Area Studies


Area studies courses focus on the history and role of specific geographic regions in the global economy. These courses may be repeated for credit as the course topics change.
IMS 7V50 Area Studies-Far East (2 or 3 semester hours) History of economic development and overview of current participation in the world economy. Prerequisite: IMS 5200 or consent of instructor. ([2 or 3]-0) T
IMS 7V52 Area Studies-Russia (2 or 3 semester hours) History of economic development and overview of current participation in the global economy. Prerequisite: IMS 5200 or consent of instructor. ([2 or 3]-0) T
IMS 7V53 Area Studies-Eastern Europe (2 or 3 semester hours) History of economic development and overview of current participation in the global economy. Prerequisite: IMS 5200 or consent of instructor. ([2 or 3]-0) T
IMS 7V54 Area Studies-Western Europe (2 or 3 semester hours) History of economic development and overview of current participation in the world economy. Prerequisite: IMS 5200 or consent of instructor. ([2 or 3]-0) T
IMS 7V55 Area Studies-Latin America (2 or 3 semester hours) History of economic development and overview of current participation in the world economy. Prerequisite: IMS 5200 or consent of instructor. ([2 or 3]-0) T
IMS 7V59 Area Studies-Special Topics (2 or 3 semester hours) History of economic development and overview of current participation in the global economy of regions of the world of timely interest to international management but outside the scope of other Area Studies courses. Prerequisite: IMS 5200 or consent of instructor. ([2 or 3]-0)T  

Directed Readings, Seminars and Research


IMS 8V40 Seminar in International Business (2, 3 or 6 semester hours) Discussion of selected concepts and theories in international business. (May be repeated for credit.) ([2, 3, or 6]-0) T
IMS 8V60 Readings in International Business (2, 3, or 6 semester hours) Investigation into the literature of topical areas in international business. ([2, 3, or 6]-0) T
IMS 8V80 Research Series in International Business (2, 3, or 6 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit.) ([2, 3, or 6]-0) T
IMS 8399 Dissertation (3 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit.) (3-0) S  

Management Information Systems


MIS 5321 Computer Programming (3 semester hours) Introductory and advanced programming techniques using C/C++ with emphasis on business applications. Concepts in JAVA will also be introduced. (3-0) T
MIS 6150 Electronic Commerce Lab (1 semester hour) Lab-based practice of electronic business concepts. (1-0) Y
MIS 6204 Information Technology and MIS Fundamentals (2 semester hours) Necessary background to understand the role of information technology and Management Information Systems in today’s business environment. Topics include: strategic role of information, organization of information, information decision making requirements, telecommunications and networking, managing information resources, distributed processing, and current information systems/technology issues. (2-0) S
MIS 6302 Strategic Impact of Information Technology (3 semester hours) The strategic implications of telecommunications technology and information systems will be explored in this course. Competitive advantage accruing from adoption of information technology solutions will be addressed. Economic issues, benefits and risks associated with technology adoption will also be addressed in this course. Related to the acquisition, deployment and benefits accruing from the implementation. (Prereq MIS 6204 or MIS 6350) (3-0) Y
MIS 6308 Systems Analysis and Project Management (3 semester hours) This course will introduce students to various methodologies for systems analysis. A critical component of the course is project management as it relates to systems development. Students will also be introduced to project management software. Prerequisite: MIS 6326. (3-0) Y
MIS 6312 Automated System Development Methodologies (3 semester hours) Emphasis on the development of information systems with automated tools. Topics include procedure definition, dialogue design, screen/report design, procedure logic design, and technical design. Students use CASE software tools to demonstrate methodologies. Prerequisite: MIS 6308 or consent of instructor. (3-0) Y
MIS 6314 System Re-Engineering Project (3 semester hours) This course utilizes Information Engineering Methodology to plan, analyze, design, and construct a working system. Students are members of a project team which will complete an advanced application execution of a “real world” development problem. Prerequisite: MIS 6308. (3-0) Y
MIS 6316 Telecommunications (3 semester hours) This course covers the fundamentals of telecommunications, including: transmission, switching, throughput and capacity, error rates and checking, and security and policy issues. State of the art technologies and their applications to business are covered in depth. (3-0) Y
MIS 6318 Introduction to Electronic Commerce (3 semester hours) Technical, economic, and managerial issues leading to prudent decision making for the implementation of electronic commerce applications and data communications networks including: overview of current technologies for enterprise-wide connectivity; the Internet and the Information Superhighway; current trends in Internet-based open systems; digital convergence of voice, video, and data; and World Wide Web programming techniques for interactive web document creation. Prerequisite: MIS 6204 or MIS 6350  or consent of instructor. (3-0) Y
MIS 6319 Enterprise Resource Computing (3 semester hours) This course is intended to cover the evolution of computing from “standalone technology islands” to networked computing systems and from standalone applications to integrated enterprise wide applications. It includes a discussion of the idea behind client server computing, application development for a client server architecture, and selection and implementation of ERP systems. A part of the course will be set aside for demonstrations and “hands on” exercises with one of the available ERP software. Prerequisite: MIS 6326. (3-0) Y
MIS 6321 Systems Simulation (3 semester hours) Multiple forms of simulation, in particular discrete simulation models. Technical aspects: generation of random numbers and variates, design of simulation experiments for optimization, analysis of data generated by simulation experiments, and validation of simulation models and results. Prerequisite: STAT 5311 or OPRE 6301 or consent of instructor. (3-0) Y
MIS 6322 Developing Business Applications with Visual Basic (3 semester hours) Students will be introduced to developing business applications using Visual Basic. Topics include fundamental Basic programming, Windows user interface design, Windows and Visual Basic controls, ActiveX controls, data controls, and integration with other applications. (3-0) Y
MIS 6323 Object Oriented Systems (3 semester hours) This course includes the fundamentals of Java programming, writing applets for web-based systems, and business application programming using Java. Prerequisite: MIS 5321 or equivalent. (3-0) Y
MIS 6324 Business Intelligence Software and Techniques (3 semester hours) This course will focus on the design and development of Decision Support Systems (DSS). Topics covered in the course will include the design and development of data warehouses to support decisions, data mining techniques, artificial intelligence techniques including design of expert systems and various types of DSS such as group and negotiation support systems. The role of theses systems in acquiring business intelligence will also be addressed in this course. Prerequisite: MIS 6326. (3-0) Y
MIS 6325 Advanced Telecommunications (3 semester hours) This course will focus on advanced technologies in wireless and wireline telecommunication systems. Topics to be covered will include: wireless voice networks, wide area wireless data networks, wireless local area networks, third generation wireless systems and broadband local access technologies and systems with a focus towards delivery of services via traditional as well as IP. Prereqquisite: MIS 6316. (3-0) Y
MIS 6326 Database Management Systems (3 semester hours) Study of relational database theories, industry standard SQL, and database design. Conceptual/semantic data modeling with the entity-relationship diagramming technique is also introduced. A client/server database environment is developed with a selected SQL server, which is Oracle, Sybase, Microsoft SQL Server or other depending on the availability, and a database application development tool. (3-0) Y
MIS 6327 Analysis and Design of Telecommunication Networks (3 semester hours) The focus of this course will be how to perform a financial analysis of telecommunication projects, schedule and manage a telecommunication project and understand mathematical modeling and design tools for voice and data networks. Prerequisite: MIS 6316, 6325. (3-0) Y
MIS 6328 Information Strategy Planning (3 semester hours) This course provides an overview of the issues involved in planning for corporate-wide information systems: how information systems are built to incorporate company goals and objectives, the implications of technology changes upon corporate cultures, project planning and task delegation and the changing role of upper management in today’s information intensive business practices. Students use CASE software tools to demonstrate methodologies. Prerequisite: MIS 6204 or consent of the instructor. (3-0) Y
MIS 6329 Contemporary Issues in Telecommunications (3 semester hours) This course covers topics that relate to legal and regulatory issues faced by telecommunication service providers and users in the US as well as around the world. The telecommunications Act of 1996 as well as changes in the regulations for broadband services and expected trends in international markets will be discussed. Prerequisite: MIS 6316. (3-0) Y
MIS 6330 Information Technology Security and Audit (3 semester hours)This course provides an overview of common security practices and introduces the concepts related to applied security technologies.  The focus of the class will be on the security and privacy of E-commerce systems. Topics include cryptography (encryption and decryption, digital signatures and certificates), risk management (threat analysis, cost benefit analysis), security audit (intrusion detection and security assurance), disaster recovery (contingency planning, incident handling, security training and awareness), network security technologies (firewalls, VPN), security policy (types of policy, implementation considerations, workplace privacy), and E-Commerce security issues (security requirements, hacker techniques, online privacy). Prerequisite: MIS 6204 or MIS 6350. (3-0) Y
MIS 6336 Computer System Evaluation (3 semester hours) Fundamentals of software appraisal, valuation of information systems, measurement of hardware performance, measurement of contract and project performance, acquisition analysis of information technologies in a target organization. Review of project and operational performance evaluation techniques. Study of the implications of information systems in terms of organization cost, budget, and maintainability. Impact of today’s information technologies within an organization and for its customers and suppliers in a national and world market. Prerequisite: MIS 6308 or consent of instructor. (3-0) T
MIS 6350 Information Technology and the Information Age Enterprise (3 semester hours) This course focuses on the use and management of information technology and networking in the Information Age Enterprise. Some of the topics include computer hardware and software, database technology, data warehousing and data mining, various types of networks including the Internet and network security, electronic commerce and virtual organizations. Students are required to master basic desktop computer applications including WWW business development tools. Students will also demonstrate their understanding of fundamental business issues of the Information Age Enterprise through in-class discussion of real-world business cases. (3-0) S
MIS 6352 Web Systems Design and Development (3 semester hours) The design of web based systems will be the focus of the course. Students will learn the fundamentals of systems development and apply this knowledge to the design of web based systems. Students will be required to develop a prototype system. Prerequisite: MIS 6323 or equivalent. (3-0) Y
MIS 6353 Intellectual Property Rights (3 semester hours) This course will explore issues associated with legal and copyright issues relating to electronic publishing. Furthermore, the course will address copyright issues with respect to software and algorithms. Issues relating to filing for patents and use of patents will be discussed. (3-0) Y
MIS 6355 Information Technology for E-Business (3 semester hours) The objective of this class will be to gain an understanding of the Information Technologies (IT) that support and drive E-business. The emphasis in the class will be on the IT architecture of an E-business. Specifically we will study technologies that underlie the Internet and Web, together with client-side and server-side computing. Issues pertaining to the design of optimal E-business systems, including web capacity planning, and optimal web server design will be briefly discussed. Prerequisite: MIS 6323 and MIS 6326. (3-0) Y
MIS 6358 Distributed Computing Technologies (3 semester hours) Architectures and technologies involved in Enterprise Application Integration and the development of large, distributed, enterprise-wide systems.  Topics include object-oriented and component technologies and different component architectures and the various implementation technologies. Comparison of architectures and technologies and strategies for making appropriate choices in business situations. Prerequisite: MIS 6323. (3-0) Y 
MIS 6360 Software Engineering Economics (3 semester hours) Advanced concepts in software engineering with a focus on economic and managerial issues. Topics include software and effort estimation, software process management, software process maturity, coordination in software teams, software development organizational forms, and project management. Prerequisite: MIS 6308. (3-0) Y  

Managerial Economics and Analysis


MECO 6215 The Economic and Legal Environment of Business (2 semester hours) This course examines the regulatory and legal environment of business. Antitrust laws and cases are examined, with particular attention to their impact on high technology industries. Comparisons between the impact of these laws and their original intent are emphasized. Additional topics include cost/benefit analysis of government regulations concerning safety, the environment, and anti-discrimination. Prerequisite: MECO 6201 or MECO 6303. (2-0) T
MECO 6303 Business Economics (3 semester hours) Foundations of the economic analysis of business problems, with special emphasis on the function and determination of market prices in production and consumption. Supply and demand, price theory, production theory, trade theory with reference to the global economy, the effects of tax and other policies in the economy, and essential elements of the banking system and monetary policy are addressed. Prerequisite: MATH 5304 or equivalent. (3-0) S
MECO 6311 Economics of Information Goods (3 semester hours) Analysis of the creation, production, pricing and distribution of products that are mainly informational in nature such as software, television, and web pages. Network effects, path dependence, the choice of standards, and the problems of public goods will be analyzed. Includes examination of the roles of patent and copyright laws in the creation of these goods and the impacts of unauthorized copying. Several case studies will be examined in detail. Prerequisite: MECO 6201 or MECO 6303 or consent of the instructor. (3-0) T
MECO 6312 Business Forecasting and Time Series Analysis (3 semester hours) A survey of techniques used in making short-term, intermediate-term, and long-run forecasts of business activity with special emphasis on time series methods. Prerequisites: MECO 6201 or MECO 6303 and STAT 5311 or OPRE 6301, or consent of the instructor. (3-0) T
MECO 6313 The Business of Entertainment (3 semester hours) This course examines the economic factors at work in the entertainment industry. The revenue generation models used by the producers of motion pictures, programming for television, radio, and cable TV, as well as videogames and book publishing will be studied in detail. The impact of digitization on costs, the role of copying and copyright, network effects, peer-to-peer file sharing, the labyrinth of property rights, and digital rights management will be examined through the lens of economics. (3-0) T


MECO 6315 Approaches to Statistical Inference  (3 semester hours) Theory and methods of statistical inference.  Classical estimation theory, classical hypothesis testing, Bayesian and alternative approaches to statistical inference, general linear model with applications, and computational methods.  Prerequisite: OPRE 6330.   (3 - 0) Y

 

MECO 6320 Introduction to Econometrics (3 semester hours) Matrix algebra treatment of traditional econometrics methods leading to the central focus of the course: modern time-series econometrics. Topics include: stochastic difference equations, stationary time-series (ARMA) models, trends and volatility (ARCH and GARCH processes), Unit Root tests, simultaneous equation time series models, and co-integration and error-correction models. (3-0)Y
MECO 6345 Advanced Managerial Economics (3 semester hours) Advanced economic analysis of consumer theory, production theory, exchange, and market interactions. Managerial topics such as: comparable worth, product standardization, environmental spillover effects, and imperfect competition. Prerequisite: MECO 6201 or MECO 6303and consent of instructor. (3-0) T
MECO 7320 Advanced Econometrics (3 semester hours) Estimation and testing of multivariate econometric models; sets of regression relationships; asymptotic distribution theory; simultaneous equation systems; applications of methods and models in the analysis of business and economic data. Prerequisite: MECO 6320. (3-0) T

Marketing Management


MKT 6220 Consumer Behavior (2 semester hours) An exposition of the theoretical perspectives of consumer behavior. Study of psychological, sociological, and anthropological findings with reference to consumer decision-making. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or consent of instructor. (2-0) Y
MKT 6231 Sales Management (2 semester hours) Techniques of sales management with emphasis upon selection, training and evaluating sales performance. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or consent of instructor. (2-0) T
MKT 6301 Marketing Management (3 semester hours) Overview of marketing management methods, principles and concepts including product, pricing, promotion and distribution decisions. (3-0) S
MKT
6309 Marketing Research (3 semester hours) Methods employed in market research to understand consumer behavior to enable better marketing decision-making. Topics include focus groups, understanding different sources of secondary data, questionnaire design, design of experiments, sampling plans, and data analysis using statistical techniques. In addition, the course will cover attitude measurement, and market research on the Internet. Prerequisites: MKT 6301 and STAT 5311 or OPRE 6301, or consent of instructor. (3-0) Y
MKT 6320 New Technology Forecasting (3 semester hours) Market analysis and demand forecasting of new technologies.  Diffusion theory including Bass Model and extensions: multiple generations of technologies, effects of decision variables, and learning.  Applications to new and developing high technology products and services.  Use of software and computer programs. (3-0) T
MKT 6322 Internet Business Models (3 semester hours) Topics to be covered are: consumer behavior on the Internet, advertising on the Internet, competitive strategies, market research using the Internet, brand management, managing distribution and supply chains, pricing strategies, electronic payment systems, and developing virtual organizations. Further, students learn auction theory, web content design, and clickstream analysis. Prerequisites: MKT6301 or consent of instructor. (3-0) Y
MKT 6323 Database Marketing (3 semester hours) Techniques to analyze, interpret, and utilize marketing databases of customers to identify a firm’s best customers, understanding their needs, and targeting communications and promotions to retain such customers. In addition, students will learn to use SAS software. Prerequisites: MKT 6301 and STAT 5311 or OPRE 6301, or consent of instructor.(3-0) Y
MKT 6329 Product Management (3 semester hours) Development and introduction of new products and the management of existing products. Topics include product positioning, screening, concept development, test marketing, and branding strategies. Further students will learn to use conjoint analysis for new product development, measurement of brand equity, product line extensions, and management of services. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or consent of instructor. (2-0) Y
MKT 6332 Advertising and Promotional Strategy (3 semester hours) The process of formulating promotional strategy with particular emphasis on advertising and sales promotions. Topics include behavioral theories of communication, budgeting, media selection, scheduling of advertisements, measurement of advertising effectiveness, and management different types of sales promotions. Students analyze grocery scanner data to evaluate the effectiveness of promotions. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or consent of instructor. (2-0) Y
MKT 6336 Pricing (3 semester hours) Techniques to price durable goods, packaged goods and services. Topics include: perceived value pricing, bundling, price discrimination, product-line pricing, dynamic pricing over the products’ life-cycle, pricing through the marketing channel, and competitive pricing. In addition to microeconomic approaches to pricing, behavioral approaches to pricing will also be covered. Pricing decisions will be analyzed using spreadsheet analysis. Prerequisites: MKT6301 or consent of instructor. (3-0) T
MKT 6350 Competitive Marketing Strategy (3 semester hours) Students learn how firms develop their marketing strategy to compete effectively in different situations. Using game theory principles, they will be exposed to competitive strategies in new emerging markets, mature markets, and on the Internet. Prerequisites: MKT6301 or consent of instructor (3-0) T
MKT 6380 Entrepreneurial Marketing (3 semester hours) Addresses the marketing challenges facing the entrepreneurial firm, including the introduction and marketing of new products and services without the benefit of an established channel infrastructure or customer base.  Topics include the development of marketing strategies, channel selection and design, product positioning, competitive pricing strategies, advertising and promotion within the framework of the resource limitations inherent in an entrepreneurial startup.  This course is equivalent to ENTP 6380 and only one of these may count toward a degree.  Prerequisites: BPS 6310 and BPS 6370 or permission of the instructor.  (3-0) T
MKT 7314 Marketing Models I (3 semester hours) Study of mathematical models used in solving marketing problems including brand switching, new product adoption, and competitive strategy models. Prerequisites: OPRE 6201or OPRE 6302 and MKT 6301, or consent of instructor. (3-0) Y
MKT 7315 Marketing Models II (3 semester hours) Advanced study of mathematical models used in solving marketing problems including brand switching, new product adoption, and competitive strategy models. Prerequisites: OPRE 6201 or OPRE 6302 and MKT 6301, or consent of instructor. (3-0) Y
MKT 7316 Marketing Models III (3 semester hours) Study of mathematical and statistical models used in the analysis of markets and marketing problems including dynamic models of marketing mix, applications of econometric methods in marketing. Prerequisites: STAT 5311 or OPRE 6301 and MKT 6301, or consent of instructor. (3-0) T
MKT 7317 Marketing Models IV (3semester hours) Advanced study of mathematical models used in the analysis of markets and marketing problems including use of game theory and modeling uncertainty. Prerequisites: STAT 5311 or OPRE 6301 and MKT 6301, or consent of instructor. (3-0) T
MKT 7318 Marketing Models V (3semester hours) Study of models relating to strategic issues in marketing including first mover advantages, interface of technology and marketing and management of novel technologies. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (3-0) T
MKT 7V12 Research Applications in Marketing (3 or 4 semester hours) Application of multivariate methods in statistics to marketing problems including discriminant analysis, logit/probit analysis, and other multivariate applications. Prerequisites: STAT 5311 or OPRE 6301and MKT 6301, or consent of instructor. (May be repeated for credit.) ([3 or 4]-0) T  

 

 

Medical Management*


*Special admission and fee requirements apply to all MED courses.

 


MED 6401  Negotiation and Conflict Management in Healthcare (4 semester hours)  Develops critical negotiating and conflict management skills to significantly improve the quality of life within a medical organization.  Topics include learning how to recognize the difference between positive and disruptive conflict, developing systems that handle conflict at the least disruptive level, mediating disagreements among colleagues, negotiating effectively against a stronger opponent and dealing with disruptive or impaired colleagues. (4-0) T
MED 6402  Financial Management of Healthcare Organizations (4 semester hours)  Develops the critical skills needed to measure and evaluate the financial consequences of important business decisions faced by healthcare professionals.  Topics include learning how to read and interpret financial statements, how to manage financial risk, determining an organization’s cost of capital, using net present value to make value creating investment decisions and developing tools to measure a medical organization’s ability to attract and retain capital. (4-0) T
MED 6403  Medical Cost and Performance Management (4 semester hours)  Cost control requires the systematic collection of revenue and cost information from both service lines and responsibility centers.  Topics include using flexible budgeting to improve operating performance, identifying and controlling the major cost drivers in a medical practice, measuring the profitability of individual medical services and developing both financial and non-financial measures of organizational performance. (4-0) T
MED 6404  Service Quality Improvement and Patient Satisfaction (4 semester hours) Provides the tools physicians and administrators need to build, position and defend their practices by increasing patients awareness, satisfaction and demand for their services.  Topics include learning how to define service quality, developing products and services that add patient value, evaluating and responding to competitors’ marketing strategies, using marketing positioning to defend their organization’s competitive advantage and assessing market data to measure marketing results. (4-0) T
MED 6405  Healthcare Information Management and Technology  (4 semester hours)  Effective use of information technology can improve service quality, lower costs and increase physician productivity.  Participants learn the critical success factors for selecting and implementing a computer information system.  Topics include analyzing new information technologies, developing an IT implementation plan and budget and managing computer consultants and contractors. (4-0) T
MED 6406 Strategic Leadership of Healthcare Organizations (4 semester hours)  Develops the strategic  thinking skills physicians and administrators need  to guide their organizations’  development during times  of turbulent change. Topics include critically assessing an  organization’s  strengths and weaknesses, detecting the competitive threats to long-term survival, identifying potential strategic partners, developing strategies that create sustainable competitive advantage and dealing with a failed alliance or joint venture. (4-0) T
MED 6407 Healthcare Policy and Regulation (4 semester hours) Examines the social and economic forces that  are shaping healthcare policy.  Analyzes the federal government’s role in the regulation, financing and delivery of healthcare, discusses the HCFA’s enforcement activities with OIG and develops a strategic response to expanding regulation and reductions in Medicare funding. This class is held in Washington, DC. (4-0) T
MED 6408  Leading Organizational Change in Healthcare (4 semester hours)  Examines change processes  how to apply them in an often uncertain and resistant environment. Topics include indepth analysis of the barriers to change in a healthcare organization, identifying the highest payoff actions and priorities, developing methods to deal with internal resistance and project management tools for tracking the change process. (4-0) T
MED 6409 Self-directed Field Study (4 semester hours) A self-directed, faculty supervised field study of the participant’s practice or medical organization using the knowledge and skills acquired in the residential program. This course is non-residential.( 4-0) T
MED 6V10 Special Topics in Medical Management Issues in current Medical Management.  Topics vary from semester to semester.  May be repeated for credit to a maximum of six hours. (|1-3|-0)Y

Operations Research


OPRE 6202 Operations Research II (2 semester hours) Continued study of operations research techniques and their uses and limitations in managing the operations of an organization. Queuing theory, simulation methods, and mathematical programming techniques, including linear, non-linear and discrete methods will be discussed. Prerequisites: OPRE 6302. (2-0) T
OPRE 6301 Quantitative Introduction to Risk and Uncertainty in Business (3 semester hours)  Introduction to statistical and probabilistic methods and theory applicable to situations faced by managers.  Topics include: data presentation and summarization, regression analysis, fundamental probability theory and random variables, introductory decision analysis,  estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and One Way ANOVA (Some sections of this class may require a laptop computer).  Prerequisite:  MATH 5304 or equivalent. (3-0) S
OPRE
6302 Operations Management (3 semester hours) Operations Management integrates all of the activities and processes that are necessary to provide products and services. This course overviews methods and models that help managers make better operating decisions over time. How these methods will allow firms to operate both manufacturing and service facilities in order to compete in a global environment will also be discussed. Prerequisite: STAT 5311 or OPRE 6301 (3-0) S
OPRE 6310 Mathematical Programming I (3 semester hours) Optimization techniques of linear models including simplex method, duality theory, variants and special implementation of simplex methods, sensitivity analysis, parametric programming. Prerequisite: OPRE 6201 or OPRE 6302 or consent of instructor. (3-0) R
OPRE 6311 Game Theory (3 semester hours) Two person zero-sum and nonzero-sum games; Nash equilibrium; use of LP and Complementarity, N-person games; core, nucleolus, stable sets, etc. Applications to market equilibrium problems. Prerequisite: OPRE 6310 or consent of instructor. (3-0) R
OPRE 6330 Probability and Stochastic Processes (3 semester hours) Basic concepts and methods from probability theory that are useful in the modeling of complex systems. Topics include Poisson and renewal processes, discrete and continuous-time Markov chains, semi-Markov processes, and various concepts of stochastic ordering. Prerequisite: OPRE 6201or OPRE 6302 and STAT 5311 or OPRE 6301, or consent of instructor. (3-0) Y
OPRE 6331 Stochastic Models in Operations Research (3 semester hours) Stochastic models in operations research. Topics include queuing models, stochastic dynamic programming, stochastic scheduling, inventory models, and simulation. Prerequisite: OPRE 6330 or consent of instructor. (3-0) R
OPRE 6335 Risk and Decision Analysis (3 semester hours) This course provides an overview of the main concepts and methods of risk assessment, risk management, and decision analysis.  The methods used in industry, such as probabilistic risk assessment, six sigma, and reliability, are discussed. Advanced methods from economics and finance (decision optimization and portfolio analysis) are presented.  Prerequisite: OPRE 6301. (3-0) T

 

 

OPRE 6340 Flexible Manufacturing Strategies (3 semester hours) The use of automation in manufacturing is continuously increasing. This course covers the variety of types of flexible automation, including flexible manufacturing systems, integrated circuit fabrication and assembly, and robotics. Examples of international systems are discussed to show the wide variety of systems designs and problems. Strategic as well as economic justification issues are covered.(3-0) R
OPRE 6360 Operations Strategy (3 semester hours) This course provides an overview of the key concepts that comprise manufacturing and service strategy.  It assumes, in broad terms, overall corporate or business unit strategy as an input and focuses on building distinctive competencies within manufacturing and services. It deals specifically with resource allocation and reallocation – relating and combining corporate strategy, manufacturing strategy and service strategy. (3-0)  T
OPRE 6361 Production Planning and Control (3 semester hours) Analysis of the production system of a manufacturing organization. Classical modeling and decision methods including simulation methods for stochastic models and exact and heuristic solutions of deterministic models. Material Requirement Planning systems and Flexible Manufacturing systems. Prerequisite: OPRE 6201 or OPRE 6302 or consent of instructor. (3-0) Y
OPRE 6362 Project Management (3 semester hours) Critical path methods for planning and controlling projects including time/cost tradeoffs, resource utilization, and stochastic considerations. Managerial considerations include project costing, organizational design, and conflict resolution. Applications include system startup/shutdown, new product introductions, management of research, and construction projects. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (3-0) T
OPRE 6363 Inventory Control (3 semester hours) Analysis of deterministic and simple stochastic inventory models. Stochastic periodic reorder models with simple deterministic and simulation solutions. Lot size models and their extensions, reorder point determination, price break, Wagner-Whitin, Modigliani-Holn models. Prerequisite: OPRE 6260 or OPRE 6302 or consent of instructor. (3-0) R
OPRE 6364 Quality Control (3 semester hours) Concepts and theory of quality control in manufacturing and service operations. Analysis of product design, process capability studies, statistical process control, and acceptance sampling. Prerequisite: STAT 5311 or OPRE 6301. (3-0) R
OPRE 6366 Supply Chain Management (3 semester hours) Key Issues associated with the design and management of industrial supply chains.  The efficient integration of suppliers, factories, warehouses, and stores so that products are distributed to customers in the right quantitiy and at the right time.  Prerequisite: OPRE 6201 or OPRE 6302 or consent of  instructor (3-0) Y
OPRE 6367 Capstone Projects in Supply Chain Management (3 semester hours) Capstone projects are sponsored by local industries and provide the students an opportunity to apply the skills and knowledge gained to solve real world challenging problems in the area of supply chain management. Students work in a team environment, interact with industry leaders and gain some industry specific knowledge. Prerequisites: OPRE 6366 or consent of instructor (3-0) R
OPRE 6368 Industrial Applications in Supply Chains (3 semester hours) The course discusses and reviews major Supply Chain challenges and relevant decision making tools used in the industry.  The course proceeds with the analysis of real-life cases during which the students obtain industry specific knowledge.  Some of the industries of interest are Telecommunications, High-tech Electronics, Semiconductors, Consumer Goods and Retail. Prerequisites: OPRE 6366 or consent of instructor.  (3-0) T
OPRE 6370 Logistics and Distribution  (3 semester hours)  This course focuses on the study of logistics systems, with emphasis on the design and analysis of  transportation and supply chain systems, including the components of transportation and supply chain systems, such as suppliers, warehouse,  material handling, customers, production, inventory, orders, transportation, and information systems;  the interactions between these components; models and  techniques for the analysis of logistics systems . Prerequisites: OPRE 6201 or OPRE 6302 or consent of instructor.  (3-0) T
OPRE 6271 Project Overview, Strategic and Process Management (2 semester hours) This course consists of an introduction to the entire project management process, including Initiation, Planning, Executing, Controlling and Closing processes. It also provides an overview of interpersonal skills and strategic and process management as related to project management and financial considerations in project selection. (2-0) R
OPRE 6372 Project Initiation (3 semester hours) Project selection, interpersonal and organizational issues related to the initiation of projects. Specific topics include investment criteria; project selection models; negotiation techniques and related interpersonal considerations. Prerequisite: OPRE 6271. (3-0) R
OPRE 6373 Project Planning (3 semester hours) Initial stages in planning a project to include scope definition; quality planning; organization considerations; negotiation; communication and decision making and related interpersonal considerations. Prerequisite: OPRE 6372. (3-0) R
OPRE 6374 Project Planning and Execution (3 semester hours) Planning techniques continued from OPRE 6373 and introduction of execution phase requirements. Included are quantitative decision making techniques; earned value measurements; interpersonal leadership principles; planning for control and execution of the project; risk management techniques and procurement principles. Prerequisite: OPRE 6373. (3-0) R
OPRE 6375 Project Execution and Closeout (3 semester hours) Techniques required for successful execution of a project continued from OPRE 6374 plus project closeout requirements. These include procurement; quality measurement; balanced scorecard; understanding of power and politics within organization and how they impact project success; integration of multiple projects; interpersonal consideration such as motivation and commitment and recognition and reward systems; and project closeout techniques. Prerequisite: OPRE 6374. (3-0) R
OPRE 6376 Advanced Project Management and Simulation (3 semester hours) Advanced methods for managing projects including capability maturity models; enterprise project management and a simulation modeling all 5 phases of the project management process. Prerequisite: OPRE 6375. (3-0) R
OPRE 6385 Scheduling (3 semester hours) Concepts and theory of scheduling problems with business applications. Combinatorial approaches for simple systems, and queuing/simulation methods for large and/or complex systems. Prerequisite: OPRE 6201 or OPRE 6302 or consent of instructor. (3-0) T
OPRE 6386 Applied Programming Languages (3 semester hours) An introduction to various mathematical, simulation and statistical software such as Mathematica, Gauss, SAS, and CPLEX. Students will use these package programs to solve problems in various business disciplines. Prerequisite: OPRE 6201 or OPRE 6302, STAT 5352, or consent of instructor. (3-0) Y
OPRE 7313 Network Flow (3 semester hours) Network flow models and solution algorithms. Matrix representations and properties, max-flow algorithms, min-cost flow algorithms, circulation and feasibility theorems, sensitivity analysis, integrality property of solutions, shortest route methods. Problems with special structure. CPT-PERT, multicommodity flows, matching, traveling salesperson problem. Prerequisite: OPRE 6310 or consent of instructor. (3-0) T
OPRE 7314 Optimization in Combinatorial Structures (3 semester hours) Optimization methods for combinatorial problems, e.g., for independent systems, blocking/antiblocking systems, matroids, graphs and hypergraphs. Polyhedral representation of convex hull of solutions and related optimization algorithms. Graph theoretic and algebraic characterizations of problems involving (totally, locally) unimodular, balanced, perfect matrices. Prerequisites: OPRE 6310 and OPRE 7313, or consent of instructor. (3-0) R
OPRE 7315 Dynamic Programming (3 semester hours) This course is an introduction to both deterministic and stochastic dynamic programming. The basic ideas of recursion and functional equation will be introduced. A wide variety of applications will be used to illustrate these concepts. Specific topics include: Markov and Semi-Markov decision processes, principle of optimality, structure of optimal policies under various cost criteria, LP formulations, and policy-improvement techniques. Prerequisites: OPRE 6310 and OPRE 6331, or consent of instructor. (3-0)R
OPRE 7320 Optimal Control Theory and Applications (3 semester hours) This course is an introduction to Optimal Control Theory and a survey of it’s selected applications in finance, production, marketing and economics. Relationships to dynamic programming and Kuhn-Tucker conditions are also pointed out. Emphasis is on modeling and not on mathematical rigor. Prerequisites: Two semesters of calculus including some knowledge of differential equations and linear algebra or consent of instructor. (3-0) Y
OPRE 7330 Deterministic Models in Operations Research. (3 semester hours) Deterministic models in operations research. Topics include linear programming, sensitivity analysis and duality, assignment problems, network models, integer programming, nonlinear programming, sequencing and scheduling models. (3-0) Y

 

OPRE 7346 Differential Games and Applications (3 semester hours)  Concepts and methods of game theory and differential games are presented, including both deterministic and stochastic models. The theory of necessary conditions, dynamic programming, and Nash equilibrium are discussed.   Applications to economics and management are presented.  Prerequisite:  OPRE 7320 or consent of instructor. (3-0) T


OPRE 7372 Advanced Topics in Supply Networks
(3 semester hours) Important and contemporary supply chain models and related quantitative methods. Main focus is on models that treat uncertainty explicitly. Integration of supply network decisions with the associated technical difficulties is the central theme. Topics include supply network design, inventory centralization, multistage production systems, value of information, pricing, risk and contracts. Prerequisites: OPRE 6302, OPRE 6330 and OPRE 6366 or consent of the instructor.(3-0) R

Organizational Behavior


OB 6231 Power and Politics in Organizations (2 semester hours) Political processes and the development and use of power in organizations including the role of power in decision making, sources of power, conditions for the use of power, assessing power in organizations; political strategies and tactics; political language and symbols, and applications to budgeting, careers and organizational structure. (2-0) T
OB 6247 Performance Management Systems (2 semester hours)A systematic approach is taken to show how performance management adds value to the organization.  Emphasis is on the manager-employee communication process involved in establishing clear expectations and understanding about the job.  Job functions, the role of the job in reaching organizational goals, performance appraisal techniques and uses, and performance improvement issues are addressed. Prerequisite: OB 6301 or consent of instructor. (2-0) T
OB 6251 Organizations and Environments (2 semester hours) Analysis of organization- environment relations, with special emphasis on managing the organization for strategic advantage. Theories and concepts will be drawn from the fields of organizational sociology, industrial organization economics, and strategic management. Topics include mergers, acquisitions, and divestitures; regulation and deregulation; the role of boards of directors; the diffusion of organizational innovations; collective organizational actions such as joint ventures, the formation of trade associations, and industry evolution. (2-0) R
OB 6301  Organization Behavior (3 semester hours) The study of human behavior in organizations.  Emphasizes theoretical concepts and practical methods for understanding, analyzing, and predicting individual, group, and organizational behavior.  Topics include work motivation, group dynamics, decision making, conflict and negotiation, leadership, power, and organizational culture.  Ethical and international considerations are also addressed. (3-0) S
OB 6303 Managing Organizations (3 semester hours) Macro-management: managing internal organizational processes such as restructuring, and external network relationships such as strategic alliances. Applications to current management issues. Prerequisite: OB 6301 or consent of instructor.  (3-0) Y
OB 6305 Foundations of Work Behavior (3 semester hours) Individual work behaviors such as organizational choice, motivation, performance, turnover, and absenteeism. Motivational processes which support such behaviors and the personal reactions of persons to them. Prerequisite: OB 6301. (3-0) Y
OB 6307 Strategic Human Resource Management (3 semester hours) Theories, concepts, and procedures involved in managing human resources. Examination of the correspondence between organizational strategies and human resources needed to carry out those strategies. Topics include job analysis, compensation and benefits, performance management, succession planning, career development issues, legal considerations, and international issues. Prerequisite: OB 6301 or consent of instructor.(3-0) T
OB 6321 Principles of Leadership (3 semester hours) Theories and techniques of leadership, emphasizing the complementary roles of management and leadership in organizations. The course will address emotional intelligence, leadership styles, communications and leadership processes, focusing on how leaders turn challenging opportunities into successes and get extraordinary things done in organizations. Self-assessment exercises will focus on the development of individual leadership skills. Prerequisite: OB 6301 or consent of instructor. (3-0) Y
OB 6322 Interpersonal Dynamics (3 semester hours) Structures and processes governing interactions among persons in small groups, linking individuals into social units. Structures of power, leadership, norms, roles and status. Processes of intimacy, influence, communication, decision making, cooperation/conflict and change. Prerequisite: OB 6301. (3-0) T
OB 6325 Social Psychology of Organizations (3 semester hours) Current social psychological theories, organizational roles, organizational stress, leadership, power, decision making, structure, quality of working life, cross-cultural issues, organizational effectiveness and change. Prerequisite: OB 6305 or consent of instructor. (3-0) R
OB 6326 Organizations and Organizing (3 semester hours) Means by which people create, maintain, and change organized work structures. Resulting alternative organizational forms are examined. Prerequisites: OB 6303 and OB 6305, or consent of instructor. (3-0) T
OB 6332 Negotiation and Dispute Resolution (3 semester hours) This course explores the theories, processes, and practical techniques of negotiation so that students can successfully negotiate and resolve disputes in a variety of situations including interpersonal, group, and international settings. Emphasis is placed on understanding influence and conflict resolution strategies; identifying interests, issues, and positions of the parties involved; analyzing co-negotiators, their negotiation styles, and the negotiation situations; and managing the dynamics associated with most negotiations. Practical skills are developed through the use of simulations and exercises.Prerequisite: OB 6301 or consent of instructor. (3-0) T
OB 6333 Managerial Decision Making (3 semester hours) Normative and descriptive examination of managerial decision making at the individual, group, and organizational levels. Exploration of cognitive heuristics, rational and non-rational decision making, temporal decision processes, and strategic decision processes under the influence of uncertainty and ambiguity of organizational contexts. Prerequisite: OB 6301 or consent of instructor. (3-0) T
OB 6340 Leading Strategic Change Processes in an International Environment (3 semester hours) This course emphasizes practical skills required to be an effective change agent. Topics include entry in change projects, negotiating role expectations, contracting, diagnostic interviewing, motivating system change and overcoming resistance, group dynamics and large group interventions, and intercultural differences in leadership expectations. All participants will be involved in a change project as part of the course. Prerequisite: OB 6301 or consent of instructor. (3-0) T
OB 6360 Information Processing and Interpersonal Skills (3 semester hours) Communication theory and application including decoding/listening, processing/analyzing, and encoding/speaking and writing. Prerequisite: OB 6301. (3-0) R
OB 7300 Organization Theory (3 semester hours) Survey of major theoretical perspectives and current research in organization theory. Prerequisite: admission to OSIM Ph.D. program or consent of instructor. (3-0) Y
OB 7303 Research Methodology in Behavioral Sciences (3 semester hours) Advantages and disadvantages of research based on field experiments, field studies, survey analyses, laboratory experiments, participant observation, content analyses, interviewing, cross-cultural studies, simulations, demographic and data archive methods. Integration of research designs and multimethod techniques. (3-0) T
OB 7306 Macro-Organizational Empirical Investigation (3 semester hours) Ph.D. seminar in the process of empirical research on organizations including formulation of a research question; the development and application of theory leading to the construction of models and the formulation of hypotheses; the design of a study; identification of data sources and the collection of data; computer analysis of data to test hypotheses; and the presentation of the study in a research paper. Emphasis will be given to linear models, archival data, and regression analysis, but other approaches will be discussed. Prerequisite: OB 7300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. (3-0) R
OB 7310 Theory and Research in Group and Intergroup Processes (3 semester hours) Current theories of group processes and group development in different social contexts. Work and non-work, intergroup relationships, group task and process issues, stages of group development, group norms, group roles, group structure, leadership, group cohesion, intergroup conflict and cooperation, intergroup interdependencies and organizational structure, boundary roles, intergroup communication, power, organizational politics, and managing intergroup differences. Prerequisites: OB 6301, OB 6303, and OB 6322, or consent of instructor. (3-0) R  

General Course Descriptions

MAS 6V00-6V10: Special Topics (1,2,3 or 4 semester hours) May be lecture, readings, or individualized study. May be repeated for credit. ([1,2,3, or 4]-0) S


    MAS 6V00 Management Science
    MAS 6V01 Management
    MAS 6V02 Organizational Behavior
    MAS 6V03 Business Policy and Strategy
    MAS 6V04 International Management
    MAS 6V05 Marketing Management
    MAS 6V06 Finance
    MAS 6V07 Managerial Economics
    MAS 6V08 Operations Research
    MAS 6V09 Accounting and Information Management
    MAS 6V10 Management Information Systems

MAS 8V00-8V10 Special Topics (1, 2, or 3 semester hours) May be lecture, seminar, readings or individualized study. May be repeated for credit. ([1, 2, or 3]-0) S


    MAS 8V00 Management Science
    MAS 8V01 Management
    MAS 8V02 Organizational Behavior
    MAS 8V03 Business Policy & Strategy
    MAS 8V04 International Management
    MAS 8V05 Marketing Management
    MAS 8V06 Finance
    MAS 8V07 Managerial Economics
    MAS 8V08 Operations Research
    MAS 8V09 Accounting and Information Management
    MAS 8V10 Management Information Systems  

MAS 8V01 Management Internship (2-3 semester hours) Course develops a student’s business knowledge through appropriate developmental work experiences in a real business environment.  Student is required to identify and submit specific Business Learning Objectives at the beginning of the semester.  The student must demonstrate exposure to the managerial perspective, via involvement or observation.  At semester end, student prepares an oral presentation, reflecting on the work experience.  Student performance is evaluated by the work supervisor. (consent of instructor required) S

MAS 8113 Practicum in Management (1 semester hour) Course develops a student’s business knowledge through appropriate developmental work experiences in a real business environment.  Student is required to identify and submit specific Business Learning Objectives at the beginning of the semester.  The student must demonstrate exposure to the managerial perspective, via involvement or observation.  At semester end, student prepares an oral presentation, reflecting on the work experience.  Student performance is evaluated by the work supervisor. (consent of instructor required)  (May be repeated for credit.) (1-0) S

MAS 8V20-8V32 Readings Series In Management Science (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester hours) Investigation into the literature of topical areas of management (May be repeated for credit.) ([2,3,6 or 9]-0) S


    MAS 8V20 Operations Research
    MAS 8V21 Management Information Systems
    MAS 8V22 Organizational Behavior
    MAS 8V23 Business Systems: Marketing
    MAS 8V24 Business Systems: Financial
    MAS 8V25 Operations Management
    MAS 8V30 Accounting and Information Management
    MAS 8V31 Strategic Management
    MAS 8V32 Business Economics  

MAS 8V40-8V528V43 Seminar Series in Management Science (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester hours) Discussion of selected concepts and theories in management. (May be repeated for credit.) ([2,3,6 or 9]-0) S


   MAS 8V40 Operations Research
    MAS 8V41 Management Information Systems
    MAS 8V42 Organizational Behavior
    MAS 8V43 Business Systems: Marketing
    MAS 8V44 Business Systems: Financial
    MAS 8V45 Operations Management
    MAS 8V50 Accounting and Information Management
    MAS 8V51 Strategic Management
    MAS 8V52 Business Economics

MAS 8V80-8V92 Research Series in Management Science (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit) ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S


    MAS 8V80 Operations Research
    MAS 8V81 Management Information Systems
    MAS 8V82 Organizational Behavior
    MAS 8V83 Business Systems: Marketing
    MAS 8V84 Business Systems: Financial
    MAS 8V85 Operations Management
    MAS 8V90 Accounting and Information Management
    MAS 8V91 Strategic Management
    MAS 8V92 Business Economics  

MAS 8399 Dissertation (3 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit.) (3-0) S