Comet Calendar, The Official Event Calendar for UT Dallas http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/rss.php en-us This week's events for Natural Sciences & Mathematics at UT Dallas NOTICE OF FINAL ORAL EXAMINATION ~ DUMINDIKA ATHTHANAYAKE SIRIWARDANE ~ CHEMISTRY http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432482?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432482?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Monday, Mar 27
(11:30 a.m.) Location: CR-Callier Center Richardson CR 1.202.

All Faculty Are Invited to the Final Examination of

 

Dumindika Aththanayake Siriwardane

Graduate Program in Chemistry

March 27, 2017, 11:30 a.m., CR 1.202

 

Title of Dissertation:

Unique Architectures Built on Chiral Polycarbodiimides

 

Student’s Supervising Committee:

Bruce M. Novak, Chair

John P. Ferraris

Mihaela C. Stefan

Ronald A. Smaldone

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Geometry Topology Dynamical Systems Seminar by Michelle Chu http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432389?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432389?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Tuesday, Mar 28
(1 p.m. - 2 p.m.)

Michelle Chu

UT Austin

Essential surfaces from intersections in the character variety

I will describe the SL2(C) character variety for a family of hyperbolic two-bridge knots. These character varieties have multiple components which intersect at points corresponding to non-integral irreducible representations. As such, these points carry lots of interesting topological information. In particular, they are associated to splittings along Seifert surfaces.

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NOTICE OF FINAL ORAL EXAMINATION ~ SAHILA PERANANTHAN ~ CHEMISTRY http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432550?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432550?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Wednesday, Mar 29
(4 p.m.)

All Faculty Are Invited to the Final Examination of

 

Sahila Perananthan

Graduate Program in Chemistry

March 29, 2017, 4:00 p.m., SLC 2.304

 

Title of Dissertation:

Preparation of Free Standing Carbon Nanofiber Electrodes for Supercapacitor Applications

 

Student’s Supervising Committee:

John P. Ferraris, Chair

Kenneth J. Balkus, Jr.

Mihaela C. Stefan

Ronald A. Smaldone

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Physic Colloquium: Microtubule polymerization dynamics - complex behavior from simple parts http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432570?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432570?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Wednesday, Mar 29
(4 p.m. - 5 p.m.)

Dr. Luke Rice (UT Southwestern)

An important frontier for modern biology is to discover and understand how collective dynamic behaviors are determined by the structural and biochemical properties of the individual components. Work in my lab seeks to solve this problem for one instance of a collective behavior, microtubule polymerization dynamics. Microtubules are hollow, cylindrical polymers built from αβ-tubulin, a complex of two related proteins. Microtubules have essential roles in cells: in non-dividing cells they form ‘rails’ on which cargo can be transported, and in dividing cells they assemble a dynamic structure called the mitotic spindle that ensures faithful segregation of the genetic material into the two daughter cells. Microtubules exhibit a fascinating, non-equilibrium property called ‘dynamic instability’, wherein they switch apparently randomly between sustained phases of elongation or shrinking. Dynamic instability is essential for proper microtubule function, and it is an intrinsic property of the polymerizing αβ-tubulin subunits. Thus, microtubule polymerization dynamics represents a collective behavior that is compositionally simple and that can be studied outside the cell using purified protein. However, and despite over 30 years of study, we still lack a predictive understanding that can connect measureable properties of the polymerizing subunits to the polymerization dynamics they generate. My presentation will provide an introduction to microtubules and their polymerization dynamics, and I will explain how my lab uses computational simulations to translate structural and biochemical properties of individual αβ-tubulins into predictions of microtubule polymerization dynamics. This approach is allowing us to discover and validate meaningful connections between subunit properties and the larger scale kinetic behavior they collectively generate. 

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NOTICE OF FINAL ORAL EXAMINATION ~ MANSOUR SALEM ALHUMIMIDI ~ GEOSCIENCES http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432506?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432506?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Thursday, Mar 30
(1:30 p.m.)

All Faculty Are Invited to the Final Examination of

 

Mansour Salem Alhumimidi

Graduate Program in Geosciences

March 30, 2017, 1:30 p.m., ROC 2.301T

 

Title of Dissertation:

Hyperspectral Imagery and Terrestrial Laser Scanning Integrated With Surface and Subsurface Data Sets for the Geologic Analysis of the Permian Carbonates of the Khuff Formation – Saudi Arabia

 

Student’s Supervising Committee:

Carlos L.V. Aiken, Chair

Fang Qiu, Co-Chair

Thomas H. Brikowski

William I. Manton

Mohammed S. Alfarhan

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NOTICE OF FINAL ORAL EXAMINATION ~ AROSHA ARUNI KUMARI KARUNATHILAKE ~ CHEMISTRY http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432505?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432505?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Thursday, Mar 30
(2:45 p.m.)

All Faculty Are Invited to the Final Examination of

 

Arosha Aruni Kumari Karunathilake

Graduate Program in Chemistry

March 30, 2017, 2:45 p.m., GR 2.302

 

Title of Dissertation:

Expanded Aromatic Monomers for Functional Porous Polymers

 

Student’s Supervising Committee:

Ronald A. Smaldone, Chair

Michael C. Biewer

John W. Sibert

Yves J. Chabal

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Green Distinguished Lecture by Dr. Bertrand Garcia-Moreno, Professor, John Hopkins http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220431446?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220431446?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Thursday, Mar 30
(4 p.m. - 5 p.m.)

March 30th, 2017 4PM at RL 3.204

Reception 3:45PM

 

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NSM - Biological Sciences presents the Green Distinguished Lecture Dr. Bertrand Garcia-Moreno, Professor and Chair of Biophysics John Hopkins Krieger School of Arts & Sciences http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432467?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432467?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Thursday, Mar 30
(4 p.m. - 5 p.m.)

Proteins as pH Sensors and Switches

Tight regulation of pH and other ionic components of the cellular milieu is the trait that is common to all living systems.  Dysregulation of pH homeostasis, in turn, is the hallmark of cancer and other diseases. We are studying the roles of proteins as biological pH sensors and switches. In this lecture I will focus on our efforts to engineer protein pH sensors.  Specifically, I will describe our studies of ionizable groups buried in dry or hydrophobic environments in proteins. These buried ionizable groups can have highly anomalous properties that are essential for all forms of biological energy transduction, and which can also be harnessed to engineer pH sensors and pH-driven switches.  I will describe structural and energetic consequences of burial and ionization of groups buried in hydrophobic environments in proteins, consequences on the conformational landscapes, challenges to theory and simulations, and implications for the evolution and engineering of novel enzymes, pH sensors, and pH-driven switches.

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NOTICE OF FINAL ORAL EXAMINATION ~ NIMALI CHATHURIKA ABEYKOON ~ CHEMISTRY http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432635?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432635?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Friday, Mar 31
(9 a.m.)

All Faculty Are Invited to the Final Examination of

 

Nimali Chathurika Abeykoon

Graduate Program in Chemistry

March 31, 2017, 9:00 a.m., GR 3.302

 

Title of Dissertation:

Supercapacitor Electrode Materials from Highly Porous Carbon Nanofibers with Tailored Pore Distributions

 

Student’s Supervising Committee:

John P. Ferraris, Chair

Kenneth J. Balkus Jr.

Mihaela C. Stefan

Ronald A. Smaldone

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NOTICE OF FINAL ORAL EXAMINATION ~ ZIJIE WANG ~ CHEMISTRY http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432539?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432539?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Friday, Mar 31
(1 p.m.)

All Faculty Are Invited to the Final Examination of

 

Zijie Wang

Graduate Program in Chemistry

March 31, 2017, 1:00 p.m., SPN 1.121

 

Title of Dissertation:

Nanostructured and Nanoporous Materials for Heterogeneous Catalysis

 

Student’s Supervising Committee:

Ronald A. Smaldone, Chair

Michael C. Biewer

John W. Sibert

Yves J. Chabal

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Actuarial Career Day Event with Willis Towers Watson http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432657?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432657?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Friday, Mar 31
(12 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.)

Dear Actuarial Students and all interested in actuarial employment opportunities,

The Actuarial Student Association (ASA) will host an Actuarial Career Day Event with Willis Towers Watson, an actuarial consulting firm.  The event will take place on Friday, March 31, 2017, from 12:00 pm to 1:30 pm in SSB 3.107B (Career Center Seminar Room).  

Lunch will be served.  Bring your resume and be ready to talk to the employer about your actuarial studies at UT Dallas and your future career plans.  

We look forward to seeing you at this event!

 

This information is also posted on the Actuarial Program website

http://www.utdallas.edu/~natalia.humphreys/

under Actuarial Program Events link.

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Mathematical Sciences Colloquium by Svetlozar (Zari) T. Rachev http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432555?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432555?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Friday, Mar 31
(2 p.m. - 3 p.m.)

Svetlozar (Zari) T. Rachev

College of Business,
Stony Brook University

Director of the Center for Finance,
Stony Brook University

Risk management, Modeling Volatile Markets and Forecasting Market Crashes

It has long been known that all classes of asset returns have fat-tailed, skewed non-normal distributions to various degrees. Yet all existing risk management and portfolio optimization systems, based on distributional models, use multivariate normal distributions. This leaves unaddressed the challenge to use multivariate non-normal distributions that can model the co-dependent extreme movements of asset returns. In this talk we discuss the application of skewed fat-tailed multivariate distributions, such as stable and tempered stable distributions, to portfolio risk calculations, modeling volatile markets, forecasting market crashes and portfolio optimization. Stable and tempered stable distributions accurately reflect the varying degrees of tail fatness and skewness of the individual portfolio assets. Additionally, this modeling framework accounts for volatility clustering and the co-dependency structure among the assets in a portfolio. Use of these stable and tempered stable distributions to compute value-at-risk and expected tail loss realizes more accurate and informative risk measures, and portfolios that yield higher risk adjusted returns. This talk discusses and demonstrates commercial applications of stable and tempered stable distributional models in risk management, modeling volatile markets, forecasting market crashes, option pricing and portfolio optimization

 

Sponsored by the Department of Mathematical Sciences

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Mathematical Sciences Colloquium by Sy Han (Steven) Chiou http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432556?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220432556?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Friday, Mar 31
(3 p.m. - 4 p.m.)

Sy Han (Steven) Chiou

Department of Biostatistics

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Permutation tests for general dependent truncation

Quasi-independence is a common assumption for analyzing truncated survival data that are frequently encountered in biomedical science, astronomy, and social science. While the concept of censoring has been rigorously studied, many are not aware of the analytic issues that arise with delayed entry, or general truncation. Ignoring dependent truncation can lead to severely biased estimation and inference. Current methods for testing quasi-independent truncation are powerful for monotone alternatives, but not otherwise. We extend methods for detecting highly non-monotone and even non-functional dependencies and develop nonparametric tests for dependent truncation that are powerful against non-monotone alternatives. We compare computation time, size and power of both conditional and unconditional permutation procedures. We apply our results to a study on the cognitive and functional decline that had delayed entry due to post-baseline imaging.

 

Sponsored by the Department of Mathematical Sciences

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