Comet Calendar, The Official Event Calendar for UT Dallas http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/rss.php en-us This Day's Events at UT Dallas ETS Workshop: Introduction to Clickers http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220416687?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220416687?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Friday, May 22
(10 a.m. - 11 a.m.)

Click Here to Register

This one-hour session introduces faculty to clickers and how to use them in the classrom to effectively assess student learning.  Topics include clicker assessment creation, best practices, importing clicker results to eLearning, and how faculty can get started using clickers.  (Please Note: Classes are limited to five participants each.  Additional dates may be added if needed.)

]]>
Microsoft Office for Beginners http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220415635?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220415635?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Friday, May 22
(9 a.m. - 12 p.m.) Location: .

You will learn: To create a basic Word document and simple Excel spreadsheet with beginner edits and formatting; start a text slide in PowerPoint; the internet and Windows Explorer at UTD;

Applications: Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Internet, Windows Explorer

For details, visit the PeopleSoft and Related Training web page for the MS Office Topics document.

This is a 3 hours course.

Register online at https://utdallas-events.edu.185r.net/Event/page2.php?e=77

]]>
International Christian Fellowship (ICF) - ICF Leadership Meeting http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220415806?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220415806?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Friday, May 22
(11 a.m. - 12 p.m.) Location: Pegasus Room.

This is a weekly meeting for ICF to discuss and plan for coming events and activities.

]]>
Preview Friday http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220416743?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220416743?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Friday, May 22
(2 p.m. - 4 p.m.)

Preview Friday provides an opportunity for transfer students to learn more about UT Dallas. Enrollment Service advisors will provide detailed information about admissions, financial aid, scholarships and campus life. Academic advisors will also conduct school-specific information sessions. The $50 application fee will be waived for attendees who submit an application for the next long semester.

]]>
Muslimahs for Change - M4C-Zohra Sarwari http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220417376?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220417376?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Friday, May 22
(4 p.m. - 9 p.m.) Location: Galaxy Rooms A & B.

Life coach and motivational speaker Zohra Sarwari will be giving a training about how to achieve your dreams. The guests will enjoy a series of exercises that will get them inspired and motivated to achieve their dreams, followed by dinner.

]]>
Muslimahs for Change - Zohra Sarwari http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220417398?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220417398?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Friday, May 22
(4 p.m. - 9 p.m.) Location: Galaxy Room.

Life coach and motivational speaker Zohra Sarwari will be giving a training about how to achieve your dreams. The guests will enjoy a series of exercises that will get them inspired and motivated to achieve their dreams, followed by dinner.

]]>
Buddhist Association - English Study--Inner Peace and Wisdom http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220416731?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220416731?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Friday, May 22
(7:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.) Location: Phoenix Room.

UTD Buddhist Association is offering English Buddhist study. The classes are informal and consist of learning, discussion and meditation, and are presented in English by invited speakers. Anyone interested in learning the Buddha’s teachings is welcome to join us!

]]>
Geocomputation Conference http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220417779?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220417779?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Friday, May 22
(8 a.m. - 10 p.m.) Location: UT Dallas Campus.

The 13th International Conference of Geocomputation will be held at The University of Texas at Dallas from May 20 – 23, 2015. This conference is a premier academic research conference focusing on computational methods for geospatial information understanding and geographic problem solving. This conference encourages diverse topics related to novel methodologies and technologies to enrich the future development of geocomputation research. Presentations cover a wide range of research in geospatial information sciences. Since 1996, Geocomputation conferences have been held in the United Kingdom, New Zealand, Australia, Ireland, China, and the United States of America. Dr. Dean and Dr. Griffith serve as co-chair of its organizing committee.

For more information, please visit http://www.utdallas.edu/geocomputation/.

 

]]>
Acoustical Society Conference (some BBS faculty will attend) http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220416958?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220416958?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Monday, May 18 - Friday, May 22 Location: Pennsylvania. ]]> 2015 Conference on Values in Medicine, Science, and Technology http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220417658?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220417658?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Tuesday, May 19 - Friday, May 22 Location: Locations Vary.

Science, technology, and medicine unquestionably have a major impact on our lives. We live with constant technological innovation and scientific discovery, and this changes the conditions that we live in, as well as the way we understand ourselves and the world around us.

Science, technology, and medicine are thus entangled with our values, our culture, and our politics, and they have an important impact on policymaking and action. The Values in Medicine, Science, and Technology  Conference will explore these themes through a variety of disciplinary approaches, including history and philosophy, bioethics and applied ethics, social studies, policy studies, literary & cultural studies,  and new media studies, as well as interdisciplinary approaches.

This year¹s conference will focus on three key themes:

  1. Gender, sex, and sexuality in science, technology, and medicine
  2. Science and values in the work of Paul K. Feyerabend, on the occasion of the 40th anniversary of Against Method
  3. Distinguishing legitimate from illegitimate roles for values in science

 

View more information on The Center for Values in Medicine, Science, and Technology website.

 

]]>
Summer 2015 Last Day for Regular Registration 1st 5-week Session http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220389531?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220389531?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Friday, May 22 ]]> Summer 2015 Last Day for Regular Registration Full Term Session http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220389521?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220389521?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Friday, May 22 ]]> Geocomputation Conference http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220417776?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220417776?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Wednesday, May 20 - Saturday, May 23
(8 a.m. - 10 p.m.) Location: UT Dallas Campus.

The 13th International Conference of Geocomputation will be held at The University of Texas at Dallas from May 20 – 23, 2015. This conference is a premier academic research conference focusing on computational methods for geospatial information understanding and geographic problem solving. This conference encourages diverse topics related to novel methodologies and technologies to enrich the future development of geocomputation research. Presentations cover a wide range of research in geospatial information sciences. Since 1996, Geocomputation conferences have been held in the United Kingdom, New Zealand, Australia, Ireland, China, and the United States of America. Dr. Dean and Dr. Griffith serve as co-chair of its organizing committee.

For more information, please visit http://www.utdallas.edu/geocomputation/.

 

]]>
The Birds - George C. McGuigan Jr. http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220418038?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220418038?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Friday, May 22 - Friday, May 29

A multimedia exhibit by Arts and Technology graduate student George C. McGuigan Jr. Opening reception will be from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday May 22.

GEORGE C. McGUIGAN JR. - STATEMENT

I am pleased to present The Birds, my final graduate work consisting of drawings, sculpture, and video.

Each of the four drawings in the exhibit are entitled Drill Chicken, and are individually numbered either one, two, three or four. The word Drill in the title of each drawing serves not only as label but also, and more importantly, to identify the mechanical device I used to create each drawing. Unlike traditional drawing where the artist holds a pencil and through hand and eye coordination places marks on a medium, in these four drawings, I affixed four pencils to a battery operated drill, and through control of the drill’s trigger switch, I lowered the rotating pencils onto the medium to begin the drawing process.

I describe this process of drawing as being “twice removed” from the medium in that in traditional drawing where only one element—a pencil—separates the artist from the medium, here two elements—pencil and drill—separated me from the medium.

Functionally, the pencil and drill each had a distinctive role to perform in the drawing process and in that process, each was as indispensable as the other. The pencil marked the medium but it was the drill that set the pencil in motion which allowed the mark to be made. Theoretically, the process used here could generate up to 4,800 pencil marks per minute assuming the drill was set to operate at maximum speed with the lowest torque setting, and all four rotating pencils made contact with the medium. While such a high number of pencil marks was theoretically possible, it was not realistically suitable to make such a high number of marks at any one time given the need to frequently review a drawing as it developed over time. Moreover, at various times during the drawing process, I had to replace and realign pencils, and in light of these considerations, the average maximum pencil marks effected in any given minute was less than 4,800.

The hanging sculpture of bird forms, which are either red, green, black or white, are a magnified example of the moving bird forms the viewer will see in the video. Approximately three years ago, I began making bird forms using standard copy paper which I folded using a traditional origami folding technique. At that time, the forms were hand painted and photographed in various environments. Later versions, of the type seen in this exhibit, still adhere to the earlier technique of formation but vary in size and color. For this exhibit, the bird forms were spray painted after being assembled. High contrast and vibrant colors were the motivating factors in choosing the colors for this exhibit.

The video represents an expression of movement and consists of many mirrored images modified through a temporal delay. Structurally, the video is composite of more than fifty video clips in which the various video clips of moving bird forms were all superimposed on top of a background video clip consisting of clouds and sky. As a bird form appears in one side of the frame, its mirror image will appear in the opposite frame; however, the mirror image in most instances is not a true reflection in that there is a time delay separating the original from the appearance of its opposite. Moreover, in most instances, the video clips were moved and adjusted along the center axis of the video frame to give the appearance that a bird form had not been previously seen when in fact it was a copy of the original whose flight path had been reversed.

In the final major scene, various video clips, most of which have been previously seen in the video, have been duplicated numerous times and re-positioned within the video frame to create a swirling bird formation designed in large part to mimic the type of actual bird patterns one might see in the natural world. Thus, the purpose in the final scene, but also throughout the entire video, was to animate an abstraction the form of which the viewer could easily recognize as a bird given its shape, movement, and its environment.

In an earlier video of similar theme, I animated the bird forms through a very manual process that involved attaching a single bird form — of the type seen hanging in the gallery—to the end of a long boom, and thereafter, I waved the boom, with attached bird, past a camera lens to capture the resulting image. In this video, movement of the bird forms was effected entirely through a basic kinetic sculpture, namely a mobile. Attached by a monofilament line to the metal rods of the mobile, the bird forms moved past a camera lens at a consistent rate of speed. The method I used here has several distinct advantages over my earlier process in that any number of birds can be suspended from the mobile, the distances between each can vary, and further, given the fact that the mobile is attached to a suspending rod via elastic bands, greater control can be effected over the speed at which the mobile turns. Given the options regarding the number of birds that can be used, the spacing arrangements, and the ability to vary the speed at which the bird forms move in time and space, the resulting number of bird patterns that can be created is significant.

I extend my sincere thanks to my faculty advisor, John Pomara, Professor of Aesthetic Studies in the School of Arts and Humanities, whose meaningful suggestions and comments throughout the semester were very much appreciated.

 

]]>
Landscapes of Mothering - Cynthia Miller http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220417796?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220417796?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Friday, May 22 - Friday, Jun 19 Location: Visual Arts Building, Main Gallery.

Reception:  Friday, May 22, 2015, 6:30 – 8:30 pm

Cynthia Miller maps the new and constantly changing terrains of mothering using a toy camera with a plastic lens.  These landscapes, created entirely in camera, combine elements of documentary and art photography. The images reference family narratives in photo albums and home movies, and create maternal identity through the stories being told.

 

CYNTHIA MILLER - STATEMENT

My work maps the new and constantly changing terrains of mothering using a toy film camera with a plastic lens. Double exposures and layered images of my children at play are created entirely in camera and then scanned so that the oversize photographs can be digitally printed. By combining elements of documentary and art photography, my work becomes a form of creative nonfiction, and moves beyond a statement of fact to an invitation to the viewer to engage in meaning creation with the artist and the subject. The images reference family narratives in photo albums and home movies, and create maternal identity through the stories being told. My photographs voice my lived experience in a way that empowers me and links my experiences to those of other mothers who document their own families. In sharing these images, together we create theories of motherhood.

 

BIO:

Cynthia Miller

I am a PhD candidate in Humanities, Aesthetic Studies at the University of Texas, Dallas and a faculty member at Richland Community College in Dallas. I have processed my world through a camera viewfinder since I was 12. I traveled the world to find more experiences, and dreamed of becoming a travel photographer. Then I had children, and the scope of my experience changed completely, confined by the demands of everyday life. In an effort to balance my creative and maternal sides, I turned my camera on my new world, and I am an artist, not in spite of my children, but because of them.

 

 

]]>
Somewhere in Texas - Devyn Gaudet http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220417797?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220417797?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Friday, May 22 - Friday, Jun 19 Location: Visual Arts Building, Main Gallery.

Reception:  Friday, May 22, 2015, 6:30 – 8:30 pm

Through the use of image and text, Somewhere in Texas sets out to creatively document the great State of Texas that we call home.  Through juxtaposing familiar images of the Texas landscape with unfamiliar details about the State itself Somewhere in Texas explores the gap between the vernacular and the landscape, often merging the two. From Dairy Queens to rivers. From motels to wild flowers. From everything I saw—to everything I didn’t.

 

DEVYN GAUDET - STATEMENT

Somewhere in Texas:

 

“Somewhere In Texas documents everything I saw—to everything I didn’t.

Everything I knew—to everything I learned.”

 

The Texas landscape is one that constantly changes as you drive across the state yet also stays familiar—as if something seen before. The project Somewhere in Texas is a photo-conceptual documentation of the State and aims to harness that familiarity, and enhance it, through the use of the banal snapshot aesthetic and the Polaroid image. The Polaroid is considered an amateur camera creating accessible images for the viewer, and also creates a sense of nostalgia. Not only through the muted hues, and range of tones, but also the Polaroid camera itself and the physicality of the images it produces. This project is composed of Polaroid transfers, digital prints, postcards, and old film boxes. The photographs presented range from common vernacular architecture such as Dairy Queen’s and motels, found text such as signage, wild flowers, rivers and created text. The created textual imagery found in Somewhere in Texas consists factual statements about the state of Texas combined with the artists own personal writings to further connect the viewer the to work. It acts as the guide through this short trip of Texas and, hopefully, serves to connect them to the piece as if it were their own. 

This series is rooted in the desire to get up and go and to show what was seen in a new intriguing way. Engaging in a conversation with artists such as John Baldessari, Ed Ruscha, and the Becher’s, Somewhere in Texas creatively documents the great State that we call home through juxtaposing familiar images of the landscape with unfamiliar details about the State itself exploring the gap between the vernacular and the landscape, often merging the two. Through this process the series challenges the “truth” by pairing factual and fictional text with straightforward banal roadside images of Texas while simultaneously creating a non-linear, yet somehow familiar, narrative of the vernacular landscape of Texas. 

 

BIO:

Devyn Gaudet is a photographer living and working in Fort Worth, Texas. A graduate of The University of Texas at Dallas (BA 2011), she is a member of the Society for Photographic Education, The Ghost Town Arts Collective, and The Junior Ward. Most recently her work has been exhibited at 500X Gallery and Life in Deep Ellum in Dallas. She is currently pursuing her MA in Aesthetic Studies at The University of Texas at Dallas.

]]>
Alpha Kappa Psi - Induction Ceremony. http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220416109?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220416109?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Saturday, Feb 7 - Sunday, Sep 27
(6 p.m. - 8 p.m.) Location: Phoenix Room.

This event is to formally induct pledges into the Alpha Kappa Psi fraternity.

]]>