Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics

Student Profile: Mona Sadeghpour

“One of the beauties of medicine is the number of opportunities it provides to serve people. It might be in the discovery of new drugs and therapies for diseases through research, working with the government on health care matters, educating both patients and students as a teacher, or serving in community clinics.

“I knew when I came to UT Dallas that I was a pre-med, but it was difficult to choose a specific major because of my interest in both science and literature.  I initially chose Literary Studies, planning to complete my medical science courses on the side. But it was going to be impossible due to the number of unique hours required for each program and the lack of any real over-lap between the two. Professor Pamela Gossin helped me find a solution--to develop a proposal for a program in Medical and Scientific Humanities.  The MaSH program bridges the traditional gap between art and science. The MaSH program is excellent preparation for students who aspire to health care professions, providing a well-rounded undergraduate education that will ultimately give them a competitive edge.

“What makes the university so very special is that it is growing by the minute and its students are participating in that growth, bringing new ideas and projects forward and helping them become realities.

“As a freshman I got to participate in the Student National Medical Association Scholars Program. I shadowed physicians through many of Dallas’ under-served community clinics. The program provided a real-life picture of how the insurance crisis in the U.S. adversely affects and shapes the lives of disadvantaged patients. And it demonstrated to me the importance of a physician in the everyday lives of those patients.”

Mona Sadeghpour, Plano, TX. Majored in biology as a pre-med student, and minored in Medical and Scientific Humanities—a program she helped design.  She is attending Yale Medical School.

  • Updated: May 1, 2009