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School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences - The University of Texas at Dallas

Jinkyung Na

 

Jinkyung Na

Assistant Professor

PhD, The University of Michigan

Cultural Differences in Social Orientation and Cognitive Style

 

GR 4.818

972-883-4746 phone

Jinkyung.Na@utdallas.edu email

 

Culture and Mind Laboratory website

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Jinkyung Na

 

Jinkyung Na is an assistant professor in Psychological Sciences at the University of Texas at Dallas. He earned his bachelor's degree and MA in psychology from Seoul National University and a PhD in Social Psychology from the University of Michigan. Also, he did his postdoctoral training in the Center for Vital Longevity.

 

Research Interests

 

My research examines the dynamic interplay between culture and human mind. Whether we recognize it or not, all of us are under the enormous influence of culture. We consume products and services that culture provides; we absorb and eventually internalize culturally sanctioned beliefs and values. Thus, the effect of culture can be revealed in various occasions ranging from a simple and mundane habit such as pronoun use (Na & Choi, 2009) to a complex problem like resolving social conflicts (Grossman, Na et al, 2010).

 

My research has been designed to demonstrate such powerful effects of culture through a variety of research methods ranging from survey, behavioral observation to brain measures (e.g., ERP). In one line of research (Na & Kitayama, 2011, 2012), I have investigated how culture shapes one's models of action (e.g., how motivates one's own behaviors or interpret another's behaviors). I have also examined how cultural differences at the group level could be translated into individual differences (Na et al., 2010).

 

Recent Publications

 

Na. J., Choi, I., & Sul, S. (in press). I like you because you think in the "right" way: Cultural Idealization of Thinking Style. Social Cognition.

 

Na, J., & Kitayama, S. (2011). Trait-based person perception is culture-specific: Behavioral and neural evidence. Psychological Science 22(8), 1025-1032.

 

Na, J., Grossmann, I., Varnum, E. W. M., Kitayama, S. Gonzalez, R., & Nisbett, R. E. (2010). Cultural differences are not always reducible to individual differences. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 107(14), 6192-6197.