Events

Previous Events

Physical Labor: Photographs of Workers, 1940 to the Present
(Comer Photography Collection / curated by Lupita Murillo Tinnen)

 

EXHIBITION description:

"Physical Labor: Photographs of Workers, 1940 to the Present" features documentary photographs by Ken Light, complemented by a range of works from the Comer Collection. These images represent a broad cross section of laborers from around the world, celebrating their strength and commitment. The exhibition also includes photographs by Sebastião Salgado, Joel Leivick, Marcus Bleasdale, George “Elfie” Ballis, Ernest Lowe, Arthur Leipzig, Gordon Parks, and Luis Mallo.

 

This exhibition marks the first decade of the Comer Collection in the School of Arts and Humanities at UT-Dallas; the collection was initiated in 2004 through the gracious donation of Marilyn and Jerry Comer.  This wide-ranging archive, comprised of over 300 photographs and hundreds of books and journals serves as a resource for graduate students pursuing research in the area of photographic practice and contemporary art.  Documentation of exhibitions organized from the collection is available at http://www.utdallas.edu/ah/comer. 

 

Curated by Lupita Murillo Tinnen, Ph.D. candidate in Aesthetic Studies

 

LUPITA MURILLO TINNEN BIOGRAPHY:

Lupita Murillo Tinnen is currently a Professor of Photography and Humanities at Collin College and the faculty advisor for the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) council #4780. She is currently pursuing a PhD in Humanities with a major in Aesthetic Studies from the University of Texas at Dallas. She holds an MFA in photography from the University of North Texas and a BA in photography from Texas A&M Commerce. Tinnen serves on the National Board of Directors for the Society for Photographic Education. As a practicing artist, her work deals primarily with cultural and personal issues stemming from her background as a first generation Mexican American. She is currently using photography to promote advocacy for the DREAM Act, a bi-partisan legislation that would allow undocumented college students a path toward citizenship. Her work has been exhibited widely throughout the US.

 

EXHIBITION RECEPTION:

Thursday, April 10, 6:00 - 7:30 pm, O'Donnell Building Gallery, first floor

Wednesday, February 26,  7:00 PM 
Venue: ATEC Lecture Hall 
Ticket: Free 
Season: 2013-14

The Metroplex Technology Business Council Lecture - Presented by The Dallas Morning News


Christian Belady, general manager of Data Center Services for Microsoft’s Global Foundation Services and a UT Dallas alumnus, will speak at the Feb. 26 lecture. He oversees all aspects of Microsoft’s global data center network, including the expansion of new data centers and the development of new standards in energy efficiency that have been adopted across the industry. Belady earned a master’s degree at UT Dallas in 1990 and received the University’s Distinguished Alumni Award in 2010.

About the Lecture Series

The University of Texas at Dallas proudly introduces the new Arts and Technology Distinguished Lecture Series.

Hosted by UT Dallas’ Arts and Technology (ATEC) program, the series features speakers from a wide range of backgrounds in science, technology and art. They will present public lectures on topics aimed at exploring the evolving relationships among art, technology, engineering and behavioral and social sciences.

The new Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building will be the lecture series’ home, offering audience members a view into the creative environment that serves to advance UT Dallas’ work at the research and educational frontiers of these coalescing disciplines.

 

Tickets

Ticket prices are $15 for seats on the lower level and $10 for the upper level. Purchase tickets online.

 

Parking

The University of Texas at Dallas is at 800 W. Campbell Road in Richardson, Texas.
Guests attending the lecture can enter campus from Campbell Road. Head north on University Parkway and 
turn right onto Armstrong Drive. Turn right onto East Drive, then left on Drive A to reach Parking Structure One. 

Directions to campus here.
Download parking map here.

 



For more information contact:
Deborah Day
debday@utdallas.edu
972-883-6504 

Patrons with disabilities who need special assistance, such as an interpreter or captioning, to attend this presentation should contact us no later than 72 hours prior to the presentation.
Wednesday, March 26,  7:00 PM 
Venue: ATEC Lecture Hall 
Ticket: Free 
Season: 2013-14

The Ericsson Lecture - Presented by The Dallas Morning News


Vint Cerf, recognized as one of the “fathers of the Internet” and vice president and chief Internet evangelist at Google, will speak on March 26. Cerf has received such honors as the National Medal of Technology, the Turing Award, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom for his role in the creation of the Internet. In his work at Google, Cerf identifies and promotes new technologies used to develop Internet-based products and services.

About the Lecture Series

The University of Texas at Dallas proudly introduces the new Arts and Technology Distinguished Lecture Series.

Hosted by UT Dallas’ Arts and Technology (ATEC) program, the series features speakers from a wide range of backgrounds in science, technology and art. They will present public lectures on topics aimed at exploring the evolving relationships among art, technology, engineering and behavioral and social sciences.

The new Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building will be the lecture series’ home, offering audience members a view into the creative environment that serves to advance UT Dallas’ work at the research and educational frontiers of these coalescing disciplines.

 

Tickets

Ticket prices are $15 for seats on the lower level and $10 for the upper level. Purchase tickets online.

 

Parking

The University of Texas at Dallas is at 800 W. Campbell Road in Richardson, Texas.
Guests attending the lecture can enter campus from Campbell Road. Head north on University Parkway and 
turn right onto Armstrong Drive. Turn right onto East Drive, then left on Drive A to reach Parking Structure One. 

Directions to campus here.
Download parking map here.

 



For more information contact:
Deborah Day
debday@utdallas.edu
972-883-6504 

Patrons with disabilities who need special assistance, such as an interpreter or captioning, to attend this presentation should contact us no later than 72 hours prior to the presentation.
Wednesday, April 16,  7:00 PM 
Venue: ATEC Lecture Hall 
Ticket: Free 
Season: 2013-14

The Northwood Woman’s Club Lecture - Presented by The Dallas Morning News


Mae Jemison, a chemical engineer, scientist, physician, entrepreneur, teacher and astronaut, will speak on April 16. She was the first African-American woman to enter NASA’s astronaut corps and flew aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1992. Jemison is multi-lingual, trained in dance and choreography, and recognized nationally as an advocate for advancing STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education for children.

About the Lecture Series

The University of Texas at Dallas proudly introduces the new Arts and Technology Distinguished Lecture Series.

Hosted by UT Dallas’ Arts and Technology (ATEC) program, the series features speakers from a wide range of backgrounds in science, technology and art. They will present public lectures on topics aimed at exploring the evolving relationships among art, technology, engineering and behavioral and social sciences.

The new Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building will be the lecture series’ home, offering audience members a view into the creative environment that serves to advance UT Dallas’ work at the research and educational frontiers of these coalescing disciplines.

 

Tickets

Ticket prices are $15 for seats on the lower level and $10 for the upper level. Purchase tickets online.

 

Parking

The University of Texas at Dallas is at 800 W. Campbell Road in Richardson, Texas.
Guests attending the lecture can enter campus from Campbell Road. Head north on University Parkway and 
turn right onto Armstrong Drive. Turn right onto East Drive, then left on Drive A to reach Parking Structure One. 

Directions to campus here.
Download parking map here.

 

 



For more information contact:
Deborah Day
debday@utdallas.edu
972-883-6504 

Patrons with disabilities who need special assistance, such as an interpreter or captioning, to attend this presentation should contact us no later than 72 hours prior to the presentation.
Wednesday, January 22,  7:00 PM 
Venue: ATEC Lecture Hall 
Ticket: Varies 
Season: 2013-14

The Susan and Ron Nash Lecture - Presented by The Dallas Morning News


Robert Edsel, writer of the acclaimed book, The Monuments Men: Allied Heroes, Nazi Thieves and the Greatest Treasure Hunt in History, will kick off the lecture series on Jan. 22. Edsel’s book follows the efforts of a special Allied force – comprised of art historians, curators and architects – with a mission of tracking and retrieving art, historic documents and other cultural treasures stolen by the Nazis during World War II. Actor and director George Clooney’s movie, The Monuments Men is based on Edsel’s book and is scheduled to premiere on Feb. 7.

About the Lecture Series

The University of Texas at Dallas proudly introduces the new Arts and Technology Distinguished Lecture Series.

Hosted by UT Dallas’ Arts and Technology (ATEC) program, the series features speakers from a wide range of backgrounds in science, technology and art. They will present public lectures on topics aimed at exploring the evolving relationships among art, technology, engineering and behavioral and social sciences.

The new Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building will be the lecture series’ home, offering audience members a view into the creative environment that serves to advance UT Dallas’ work at the research and educational frontiers of these coalescing disciplines.

 

Tickets

Ticket prices are $15 for seats on the lower level and $10 for the upper level. Purchase tickets online.

 

Parking

The University of Texas at Dallas is at 800 W. Campbell Road in Richardson, Texas.
Guests attending the lecture can enter campus from Campbell Road. Head north on University Parkway and 
turn right onto Armstrong Drive. Turn right onto East Drive, then left on Drive A to reach Parking Structure One. 

Directions to campus here.
Download parking map here.

 



For more information contact:
Deborah Day
debday@utdallas.edu
972-883-6504 

Patrons with disabilities who need special assistance, such as an interpreter or captioning, to attend this presentation should contact us no later than 72 hours prior to the presentation.

Learn more about Arts and Humanities faculty! Faculty members will present short lectures on their areas of interest, research and courses. Previous topics have included crowdsourcing, religion and politics, visual sampling, and internet art.

What is it? 
When should I begin? 
What do I do? 
Who should supervise?

Join ATEC and EMAC advisors and faculty for this discussion about capstone preparation.  Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors are encouraged to attend.  It is never too early to start thinking about your capstone project.

A panel of ATEC and EMAC alumni will discuss their careers and how they have used their degrees.  Following the panel discussion, a networking session will be held with various representatives from companies in the DFW area.

ARS Research Colloquia Series of the UT Dallas ATEC/EMAC Programs

Art Rendevous Science

Presents:

The Force Majeure

Newton and Helen Mayer Harrison

The Harrison Studio

http://theharrisonstudio.net/

Thursday, November 14, 2013 at Noon

ATEC Conference Room, ATC 2.807

Abstract:

Newton and Helen Mayer Harrison will be talking and sharing their work that addresses the accelerating transaction between aspects of the Global Warming phenomenon and their interaction with the many ecosystems that are under stress or in actual turbulence from over-demand by human activity. The work envisions a counter to the reduction of production and consumption due to market contraction and turbulence that mirrors the shrinking productivity and wellbeing of the world ocean and many other overstressed planetary sub-systems. Their Force Majeure work is designed to make clear, albeit in a very simple way, that subcontinents and countries that inhabit them are not equipped conceptually, legally, or structurally to meet a future shaped by such a force.

Biography:

Among the leading pioneers of the eco-art movement, the collaborative team of Newton and Helen Mayer Harrison (often referred to simply as “the Harrisons”) have worked for almost forty years with biologists, ecologists, architects, urban planners and other artists to initiate collaborative dialogues to uncover ideas and solutions which support biodiversity and community development.

The Harrison’s concept of art embraces a breathtaking range of disciplines. They are historians, diplomats, ecologists, investigators, emissaries and art activists. Their work involves proposing solutions and involves not only public discussion, but extensive mapping and documentation of these proposals in an art context.

Past projects have focused on watershed restoration, urban renewal, agriculture and forestry issues among others. The Harrisons’ visionary projects have often led to changes in governmental policy and have expanded dialogue around previously unexplored issues leading to practical implementations throughout the United States and Europe.

The ATEC/EMAC Colloquium Committee welcomes suggestions for speakers visiting the metroplex or from the metroplex. Please send your suggestions to one of the Colloquium Committee Members: Professors Roger Malina and Mihai Nadin; co-chairs: Paul Fishwick, Mona Kasra and Bonnie Pitman.

ARS Research Colloquia Series of the UT Dallas ATEC/EMAC Programs

Art Rendevous Science

Presents:

DIVAs: A Framework for the Development of Agent-Based Simulation Systems

Dr. Rym Z. Wenkstern

Associate Professor

Department of Computer Science

Wednesday, October 16, 2013 at Noon

ATC 2.807

Abstract: Over the past several years researchers at the UTD MAVs lab have developed a framework for the development of large scale multi-agent based simulation systems. The framework called DIVAs (Dynamic Information Visualization of Agent systems) offers reusable architectures, abstract classes, software components and libraries that support the rapid development of enterprise-scale simulation systems. DIVAs is based on the premises that a) virtual agents are situated in an open (i.e., inaccessible, non-deterministic and dynamic) environment that is partially perceived and b) the environment is totally decoupled from the virtual agents.

In this talk I will give an overview of the DIVAs architecture and discuss how the framework was used to create an urban city and an office environment simulator. In both simulators, the environment is dynamic and non-deterministic. Virtual agents perceive their surroundings through vision, auditory and olfactory sensors. They execute complex path-finding and collision avoidance algorithms to move within the environment and deliberate to achieve their goals. The user of the simulator can modify agent and environment properties at run-time without interrupting the simulation.

Biography: Dr. Rym Zalila-Wenkstern is an Associate Professor at the Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science, UTD. She holds a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Ottawa, Canada, and the Doctorat de Spécialité in Computer Science from the University of Tunis, Tunisia. Dr. Wenkstern is the director of the Multi-Agent and Visualization Systems lab. Her research projects are sponsored by several organizations including the National Science Foundation, Sandia National Laboratories, Rockwell Collins and the Department of Education. She is the author or co-author of more than 60 technical papers in the areas of multi-agent systems and software engineering. She served as general chair and program chair for the international conference in Software Engineering and Data Engineering and the IEEE African Conference on Software Engineering and Applied Computing.  She has worked as a consultant for U.S. and European organizations and is the CEO of ZW Corp, a startup specializing in the development of web-based multi-agent systems. Dr. Wenkstern’s work on the DIVAs project received the Best Paper Award at the Agent Directed-Simulation symposium in 2012, the Best Overall Paper Award at the Spring Simulation Multi-Conference in 2012, and the Best System/Demo Award at AAMAS, the leading international conference in multi-agent systems in 2013

ARS Research Colloquia Series of the UT Dallas ATEC/EMAC Programs

Art Rendevous Science

Presents:

Nurturing Cultural Science

Dr. Maximilian Schich
Associate Professor

Wednesday, October 9, 2013 at Noon
ATEC Conference Room, ATC 2.807

 

Abstract:  The process of understanding art and culture is mostly dominated by qualitative humanistic inquiry.  Technology within the process is used widely of course, for example within the systematic collection of data, material analysis, visualization, and ever closer or more distant readings than possible with a bare eye.  Yet, most humanists and technologists involved in the process still work side-by-side.

In this talk, I aim to convince the audience that the time is ripe for cultural science – for humanists to embrace physics, computer science, and information design to engage in a coherent process where humanists become scientists and scientists become humanists. Results will include a better understanding of culture as a complex system, the dynamics of canons and worldviews from games to scholarship, the conscious knowledge of gaps and biases in our tools and perceptions, and new frontiers of inquiry.

The key premise of my talk is that, similar to the shift from classic anatomy to systems biology, the transition to cultural science will radically change the way we work and understand the world.

Biography:  Dr. Maximilian Schich is a multidisciplinary researcher, currently focusing on (super)exponential cultural interaction.  He joined The University of Texas at Dallas as an Associate Professor for Arts and Technology in Spring 2013.  Before, Max started to deal with cultural graph data in 1996.  After receiving his Ph.D. in art history at HU-Berlin and Max-Planck in Rome, Max continued to work on the Ecology of Complex Networks in Art and Culture with a group of outstanding physicists and computer scientists in the labs of László Barabási  and Dirk Helbing.  Currently, he also acts as an Editorial Advisor at Leonardo (the International Society for Art, Science, and Technology) and chairs a popular symposium series on Art, Humanities, and Complex Networks at NetSci conferences.

Explore sound design behind musicscapes of the Perot Museum and the technical and creative process sonification of scientific data with Dr. Frank Dufour, Associate Director for Doctoral Program and Scot Gresham-Lancaster, Sound Design from ATEC at the University of Texas at Dallas.

 

Perot Social Science: Sound

Curious about the effect of sound on your brain? Find out at our next Social Science, a night for adults 21+ to play in the museum with signature cocktails, friends, or even bring a date. There is something for everyone on October 4, including experimental music, a live band, a silent disco, and even improv dance performances. Try mixing your own music, create an instrument, and meet our guest neuroscientist and musicians.

ARS Research Colloquia Series of the UT Dallas ATEC/EMAC Programs

Art Rendevous Science

Presents:

Structuring Design Ecologies for Digital Games and Simulations

Monica Evans

Associate Professor

Wednesday, September 25, 2013 at Noon

ATEC Conference Room, ATC 2.807

Abstract:

The computer game is fundamentally an interactive medium that nevertheless has shown great potential for meaningful, immersive narratives. For both immersion and agency, designers often want to give players as much control as possible over the game’s narrative direction and outcome, while still presenting a well-constructed, highly crafted story. Game systems design is primarily used to facilitate game mechanics, such as combat, crafting, movement mechanics, or inventory management. This talk proposes a new model for design ecology: a method that can be used to create environments in which well-crafted narrative will occur by necessity with a minimum of scripted or pre-planned events, allowing the player’s desires and demands to fully shape the experience. The method allows narrative systems to fully integrate with all other game systems, as well as present a consistent, internally coherent world that facilitates player agency throughout multiple permutations of possible outcomes.

Biography:

Monica Evans is Associate Professor of Computer Game Design in the Arts and Technology (ATEC) program at UT Dallas, named to the Princeton Review Top Schools in Gaming three years running. She has designed and developed experimental and educational games with numerous university partners, including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the University of Texas System, the United States Department of Defense (TRADOC and JFCOM), and multiple arts institutions in the Dallas Fort Worth Metroplex. Dr. Evans coordinates the game development area of the Arts and Technology program, including courses in game development, design, and studies, as well as the Game Production Lab, which focuses on the creation of innovative student games. Dr. Evans’ latest work includes both large-scale projects in educational games and simulation; and independent projects such as “Fourplay”, an educational game about string quartets; and “Reading the Book is Cheating,” a series of short art games based on classic literature.

Upcoming Colloquium:

October 9:  Maximilian Schich, Associate Professor, Arts and Technology

October 16:  Rym Zalila-Wenkstern, Associate Professor of Computer Science

The ATEC/EMAC Colloquium Committee welcomes suggestions for speakers visiting the metroplex or from the metroplex. Please send your suggestions to one of the Colloquium Committee Members: Professors Roger Malina and Mihai Nadin; co-chairs: Paul Fishwick, Mona Kasra and Bonnie Pitman.

On Friday September 13th, the Student Game Developer Alliance here on campus has an exciting event planned for you! 

Anthony Burch, the head writer for Gearbox Software's Borderlands 2 will be here to give a talk on writing for video games! The event should last about two hours, with plenty of time for Q&A from students!

We highly encourage all students to attend this event! Even if you're not a writer or game developer, this talk should be highly informative and, if his work is any indication, highly entertaining!

The talk starts at 7:00pm and will be held in the Jonsson Performance Hall (JO 2.604), and we encourage you to arrive early!

For more information and more awesome future events, check out the Student Game Developer Alliance's Facebook Group, and the event page for Anthony's talk

 

 

 

The School of Arts and Humanities is proud to highlight the work of our talented undergraduate and graduate students in the Emerging Media and Communications program. These capstone projects represent the culmination of years of forethought, planning and effort by our students.

 

A prize of $250 will be awarded for one outstanding undergraduate student project and one outstanding graduate student project.

 

Light refreshments and snacks will be provided during intermission.

 

A recording of the presentation will be available via the EMAC program Youtube channel after the event. Follow the event live on twitter with the hashtag #emacC2

ARS Research Colloquia Series of the UT Dallas ATEC/EMAC Programs

Art Rendevous Science

http://www.utdallas.edu/atec/events/colloquia.html

Presents:

Border Territories: Experimental Curating and the In-Between

Rob La Frenais

Curator - The Arts Catalyst

and

Kerry Doyle

Director - Stanlee and Gerald Rubin Center for the Visual Arts

The University of Texas at El Paso

Wednesday, May 1, 2013 at Noon

ATEC Conference Room, ATC 1.606

Abstract:

Rob La Frenais and Kerry Doyle are collaborating with UT Dallas faculty member Roger Malina on "Territory of the Imagination: Art and Space in the Americas", an international partnership that will team scientists, artists, graduate and undergraduate students on a large scale artistic, scientific, and educational project about art and space research and exploration in the Americas.  This multi-year effort will prioritize the participation of US Latino and Latin American artists and researchers. In this colloquium, La Frenais and Doyle will present their previous experience and approaches to curating work that crosses borders of art, science and culture.

Biography:

Dr. Rob La Frenais has been a contemporary art curator for 25 years. He believes in being directly engaged with the artist’s working process as far as possible, while actively widening the context within which the artist can work. For the last 15 years he has been based at The Arts Catalyst, a nationally funded organization in London, UK, where, along with director Nicola Triscott he has developed an influential international programme of collaborations based on interactions between art and science.  His most recent exhibition with the Arts Catalyst, Republic of the Moon opened this year in Liverpool and is now touring internationally. He was awarded an honorary Doctorate, Dartington College of Art in 2005 and in 2006 completed a Ph.D. from Brunel University based on his practice as a curator. He was also the first curator ever to experience zero gravity, with a group of artists, at Star City in Moscow in 1999 and went on, with the Arts Catalyst to enable around 50 artists (and scientists) to work in an environment previously only experienced by astronauts and space scientists.

Kerry Doyle is the Director of the Stanlee and Gerald Rubin Center for the Visual Arts at The University of Texas at El Paso.  The mission of the Rubin Center is to curate and commission works of contemporary art that encourage adventuresome thinking and dialogue. Located on the US/Mexico border and at the epicenter of the Americas, the Rubin serves as a laboratory for emerging artists and innovative practitioners from across the globe. Doyle specializes in projects that are interdisciplinary, participatory and performative, with a special focus on the border as subject and site.

Note:  A limited number of box lunches will be available.

The ATEC/EMAC Colloquium Committee welcomes suggestions for speakers visiting the metroplex or from the metroplex. Please send your suggestions to one of the Colloquium Committee Members: Professors Roger Malina and Mihai Nadin; co-chairs: Andrew Famiglietti, Paul Fishwick, Mona Kasra and Bonnie Pitman.

ARS Research Colloquia Series of the UT Dallas ATEC/EMAC Programs

Art Rendevous Science

Presents:

Computing-Inspired Roles of Language and Culture in the 21st Century

Dr. Paul Fishwick

Distinguished Endowed Chair of Arts and Technology

Professor of Computer Science

Wednesday, April 24, 2013 at Noon

ATEC Conference Room, ATC 1.606

Abstract:

The idea of integrating science and engineering with arts and humanities is one that has been around for millennia in different forms. In the new century, there are two parallel threads which are converging: 1) the cultural inevitability of computational thinking in our daily lives, and 2) arts and humanities guided constructions for elements in science and engineering. For #1, we think differently as a result of our computing technologies: figuring out how to operate the simplest of devices is an exercise in thinking in terms familiar to computer scientists. As such, these new modes of thinking reflect new culture with languages that are not natural, but artificial. Everyone must learn principles that define this new thinking; most of the principles come from Computer Science. For #2, representations of mathematical and computing artifacts can be guided by methods and products found in the arts and humanities. These representations may enhance cognitive functions such as learning, attention, attitude, behavioral change, and memory enhancement especially for the general public.

Biography:

Dr. Fishwick has six years of industry experience as a systems analyst working at Newport News Shipbuilding and at NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia. He has been on the faculty at the University of Florida since 1986, and is Director of the Digital Arts and Sciences Programs there. His Ph.D. was in Computer and Information Science from the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Fishwick is active in modeling and simulation, as well as in the bridge areas spanning art, science, and engineering. He pioneered the area of aesthetic computing, resulting in an MIT Press edited volume in 2006. He is a Fellow of the Society for Computer Simulation, served as General Chair of the Winter Simulation Conference (WSC), was a WSC Titan Speaker in 2009, and has delivered over fifteen keynote addresses at international conferences. He is Chair of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Special Interest Group in Simulation (SIGSIM). Dr. Fishwick has over 200 technical papers and has served on all major archival journal editorial boards related to simulation, including ACM Transactions on Modeling and Simulation (TOMACS) where he was a founding area editor of modeling methodology in 1990.

Note:  A limited number of box lunches will be available.

The ATEC/EMAC Colloquium Committee welcomes suggestions for speakers visiting the metroplex or from the metroplex. Please send your suggestions to one of the Colloquium Committee Members: Professors Roger Malina and Mihai Nadin; co-chairs: Andrew Famiglietti, Paul Fishwick, Mona Kasra and Bonnie Pitman.