Events

Across all the schools and components of UT Dallas, the same question has to be clearly addressed:

How to best prepare our graduate students for rewarding lives and productive careers in a constantly changing world?

This mission implies multiples challenges mostly related to internationality and interdisciplinarity.

How do we make sure that students and faculty members understand each other across disciplines, across languages, and across cultures?

Please come join us to discuss these issue.

Refreshments will be served.

Speakers include:

Cristen Casey, Assistant Vice President of International Programs. Cristen is responsible for the development of programs that support international recruitment and retention; the creation of opportunities for international partnerships; the expansion of education abroad opportunities.

Dr. Jane Salk, Professor at the Naveed Jindal School of Management. Dr. Salk’s research combines an interest in organizations, strategy, and International management. She has published award-winning research on learning through inter-organizational collaboration, and how social identity processes affect cooperation and team development.

Dr. Dohyeong Kim, Professor at the school of Economic, Political, and Policy Sciences, and director of the Center for Geospatial Research in Global Health Policy. The main goal of his research is to develop an information-based tool to help policy makers around the world address environmental and health risks. His research focuses on public policy and planning issues in Asia, Africa and the U.S., with an emphasis on health and environmental policy analysis. His recent research efforts address issues including childhood lead poisoning, malaria control, indoor and outdoor air quality, allergic disease, food security and poverty, and vaccination delivery.

Dr. Habte Woldu, Professor at the Naveed Jindal School of Management and director of the Master’s program in International Management Sciences. His research is in cross-cultural studies.

Dr. Frank Dufour, Professor at the School of Arts, Technology, and emerging Communication.

 

 

Previous Events

Wednesday, February 26,  7:00 PM 
Venue: ATEC Lecture Hall 
Ticket: Free 
Season: 2013-14

The Metroplex Technology Business Council Lecture - Presented by The Dallas Morning News


Christian Belady, general manager of Data Center Services for Microsoft’s Global Foundation Services and a UT Dallas alumnus, will speak at the Feb. 26 lecture. He oversees all aspects of Microsoft’s global data center network, including the expansion of new data centers and the development of new standards in energy efficiency that have been adopted across the industry. Belady earned a master’s degree at UT Dallas in 1990 and received the University’s Distinguished Alumni Award in 2010.

About the Lecture Series

The University of Texas at Dallas proudly introduces the new Arts and Technology Distinguished Lecture Series.

Hosted by UT Dallas’ Arts and Technology (ATEC) program, the series features speakers from a wide range of backgrounds in science, technology and art. They will present public lectures on topics aimed at exploring the evolving relationships among art, technology, engineering and behavioral and social sciences.

The new Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building will be the lecture series’ home, offering audience members a view into the creative environment that serves to advance UT Dallas’ work at the research and educational frontiers of these coalescing disciplines.

 

Tickets

Ticket prices are $15 for seats on the lower level and $10 for the upper level. Purchase tickets online.

 

Parking

The University of Texas at Dallas is at 800 W. Campbell Road in Richardson, Texas.
Guests attending the lecture can enter campus from Campbell Road. Head north on University Parkway and 
turn right onto Armstrong Drive. Turn right onto East Drive, then left on Drive A to reach Parking Structure One. 

Directions to campus here.
Download parking map here.

 



For more information contact:
Deborah Day
[email protected]
972-883-6504 

Patrons with disabilities who need special assistance, such as an interpreter or captioning, to attend this presentation should contact us no later than 72 hours prior to the presentation.
Wednesday, March 26,  7:00 PM 
Venue: ATEC Lecture Hall 
Ticket: Free 
Season: 2013-14

The Ericsson Lecture - Presented by The Dallas Morning News


Vint Cerf, recognized as one of the “fathers of the Internet” and vice president and chief Internet evangelist at Google, will speak on March 26. Cerf has received such honors as the National Medal of Technology, the Turing Award, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom for his role in the creation of the Internet. In his work at Google, Cerf identifies and promotes new technologies used to develop Internet-based products and services.

About the Lecture Series

The University of Texas at Dallas proudly introduces the new Arts and Technology Distinguished Lecture Series.

Hosted by UT Dallas’ Arts and Technology (ATEC) program, the series features speakers from a wide range of backgrounds in science, technology and art. They will present public lectures on topics aimed at exploring the evolving relationships among art, technology, engineering and behavioral and social sciences.

The new Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building will be the lecture series’ home, offering audience members a view into the creative environment that serves to advance UT Dallas’ work at the research and educational frontiers of these coalescing disciplines.

 

Tickets

Ticket prices are $15 for seats on the lower level and $10 for the upper level. Purchase tickets online.

 

Parking

The University of Texas at Dallas is at 800 W. Campbell Road in Richardson, Texas.
Guests attending the lecture can enter campus from Campbell Road. Head north on University Parkway and 
turn right onto Armstrong Drive. Turn right onto East Drive, then left on Drive A to reach Parking Structure One. 

Directions to campus here.
Download parking map here.

 



For more information contact:
Deborah Day
[email protected]
972-883-6504 

Patrons with disabilities who need special assistance, such as an interpreter or captioning, to attend this presentation should contact us no later than 72 hours prior to the presentation.
Wednesday, April 16,  7:00 PM 
Venue: ATEC Lecture Hall 
Ticket: Free 
Season: 2013-14

The Northwood Woman’s Club Lecture - Presented by The Dallas Morning News


Mae Jemison, a chemical engineer, scientist, physician, entrepreneur, teacher and astronaut, will speak on April 16. She was the first African-American woman to enter NASA’s astronaut corps and flew aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1992. Jemison is multi-lingual, trained in dance and choreography, and recognized nationally as an advocate for advancing STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education for children.

About the Lecture Series

The University of Texas at Dallas proudly introduces the new Arts and Technology Distinguished Lecture Series.

Hosted by UT Dallas’ Arts and Technology (ATEC) program, the series features speakers from a wide range of backgrounds in science, technology and art. They will present public lectures on topics aimed at exploring the evolving relationships among art, technology, engineering and behavioral and social sciences.

The new Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building will be the lecture series’ home, offering audience members a view into the creative environment that serves to advance UT Dallas’ work at the research and educational frontiers of these coalescing disciplines.

 

Tickets

Ticket prices are $15 for seats on the lower level and $10 for the upper level. Purchase tickets online.

 

Parking

The University of Texas at Dallas is at 800 W. Campbell Road in Richardson, Texas.
Guests attending the lecture can enter campus from Campbell Road. Head north on University Parkway and 
turn right onto Armstrong Drive. Turn right onto East Drive, then left on Drive A to reach Parking Structure One. 

Directions to campus here.
Download parking map here.

 

 



For more information contact:
Deborah Day
[email protected]
972-883-6504 

Patrons with disabilities who need special assistance, such as an interpreter or captioning, to attend this presentation should contact us no later than 72 hours prior to the presentation.
Wednesday, January 22,  7:00 PM 
Venue: ATEC Lecture Hall 
Ticket: Varies 
Season: 2013-14

The Susan and Ron Nash Lecture - Presented by The Dallas Morning News


Robert Edsel, writer of the acclaimed book, The Monuments Men: Allied Heroes, Nazi Thieves and the Greatest Treasure Hunt in History, will kick off the lecture series on Jan. 22. Edsel’s book follows the efforts of a special Allied force – comprised of art historians, curators and architects – with a mission of tracking and retrieving art, historic documents and other cultural treasures stolen by the Nazis during World War II. Actor and director George Clooney’s movie, The Monuments Men is based on Edsel’s book and is scheduled to premiere on Feb. 7.

About the Lecture Series

The University of Texas at Dallas proudly introduces the new Arts and Technology Distinguished Lecture Series.

Hosted by UT Dallas’ Arts and Technology (ATEC) program, the series features speakers from a wide range of backgrounds in science, technology and art. They will present public lectures on topics aimed at exploring the evolving relationships among art, technology, engineering and behavioral and social sciences.

The new Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building will be the lecture series’ home, offering audience members a view into the creative environment that serves to advance UT Dallas’ work at the research and educational frontiers of these coalescing disciplines.

 

Tickets

Ticket prices are $15 for seats on the lower level and $10 for the upper level. Purchase tickets online.

 

Parking

The University of Texas at Dallas is at 800 W. Campbell Road in Richardson, Texas.
Guests attending the lecture can enter campus from Campbell Road. Head north on University Parkway and 
turn right onto Armstrong Drive. Turn right onto East Drive, then left on Drive A to reach Parking Structure One. 

Directions to campus here.
Download parking map here.

 



For more information contact:
Deborah Day
[email protected]
972-883-6504 

Patrons with disabilities who need special assistance, such as an interpreter or captioning, to attend this presentation should contact us no later than 72 hours prior to the presentation.

Dr. Zachary T. Campbell

www.RNAcentral.com

Dr. Campbell is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at UT Dallas who is interested in how the biological instructions encoded by the genome are executed. The Campbell lab focuses on two key biological contexts: pain and stem cells. Their goal is to use functional genomics technology to create better alternatives to opiates and to improve our understanding of how cellular fates evolve. Dr. Campbell joins the Department of Biological Sciences at UTD following six years of post-doctoral studies with Marv Wickens at UW-Madison. For a comprehensive list of publications please visit www.RNAcentral.com.

Sharon Hewitt 

Sharon is a graduate of UT Dallas with an MFA from ATEC and a Senior Lecturer for Digital Video and Design 1 courses. As a graduate student, Sharon worked as a research assistant for the Creative Automata Lab and the Center for Modeling & Simulation. Her research pursuits and artistic endeavors include studying immersive and interactive video experiences and perception related to video segmentation.

We will also ask all those new faculty members present to introduce themselves and share their interests. We thank all of new faculty who presented last time and have an open invitation to all new faculty to come discuss at a future watering hole.

Graduating students share their capstone projects and compete for outstanding capstone awards. Come admire students' hard work, find inspiration for your upcoming capstone project, and celebrate the EMAC community. This event is open to the public. PS1 has the most convenient visitor parking (https://www.utdallas.edu/services/download/Parking_Map.pdf).

Dr. Peter Beyls

Art As Speculative Computing

My work explores the potential of writing software towards the investigation of random ideas, aesthetic problems and artistic ambitions. Writing computer programs becomes a channel for self-discovery, for playing with ideas for what I have come to call “conceptual navigation” – the pragmatic exploration of ones belief-system as an artist. Much of my work can be described as “speculative computing” since it focuses on the integration of intuition and intellect in an interdisciplinary artistic practice. I am interested in dynamical systems in art and science and I’m fascinated by complexity as found in natural and social systems. I wonder how the private imagination of the artists relates to all this and how, for instance, aspects of personal creativity could be formalized and implemented in a functional program. In the end, the concern arises of how to map digital artifacts back into the analog world as to make them available for humans to be perceived – which raises exciting questions of tangibility and embodiment. My talk first briefly addresses the various computational models I explored over the years; from random speculation to complex rule-based systems to distributed agents-based systems thriving on self-organization.I will also describe my most recent research in Sound and Music Computing instigated at CITAR, (Centre for Research in Science and Technology for the Arts), at UC Porto. Keywords in this respect include machine learning and behavioral control structures affording advanced human-machine interaction.

Bio

Peter Beyls develops generative systems in music, the visual arts and hybrid formats. He studied at the Royal Music Conservatory Brussels, EMS Stockholm, Ghent University and the Slade School of Art, University College London. Beyls was awarded a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Plymouth, UK for his research in evolutionary computing applied to real-time interactive music systems. Beyls published extensively on various aspects of digital art and lectures and exhibits worldwide. He is currently full-time research professor at the Centre for Research in Science and Technology for the Arts (CITAR), Universidade Católica Portuguese, Porto. On October 30, 2014, MER PaperKunsthalle published Simple Thoughts, a monograph documenting his work.

http://www.peterbeyls.net/

Sonny Liew talks about his new graphic novel "The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye". There will copies available to purchase and Sonny will be available for signings after the presentation.

Free admission.

Please reserve your ticket through Eventbrite:
http://www.eventbrite.com/e/graphic-novelist-sonny-liew-the-art-of-charlie-chan-hock-chye-tickets-24025904126?aff=efbevent

Judge John Marshall

Senior Judge, Fourteenth Judicial District of Texas. Elected Member of the International Academy of Astronautics, co-author of a history of the Apollo Program B.A., History, J.D., SMU, member Mexican Academy of International Law.

A space pioneer who worked on the Apollo program and a Judge, coined the term cyber-ethics when faced with cases in his court. He will talk about how the process of assembly and launch of the Apollo/Saturn V space vehicle at the Kennedy    Space Center did not originate in the United States and conceptually dates back to the  Fritz Lang movie Die Frau im Mond.  Science fiction became science fact.

Ken Murphy

(a/k/a 'the Gen X Moon guy') has been involved in space advocacy for over a decade and a half, the result of a Model UN, leading to a UN conference, leading to a Master of Space Studies degree (cum laude) from International Space University, and a host of space-related adventures since then. 

He will discuss the annual Moon Day event in D/FW which he has organized since 2009.and has grown to become one of the premier STEM events in North Texas, and the largest annual space celebration in Texas.  He will discuss the roots of Yuri’s night, Moon Day, the Texas Space Economy and the Cislunar Econosphere concept.

For those of you not familiar with Yuri’s Night it is a planetary wide party https://yurisnight.net/ celebrating the launch of the first human in space on April 12 1961. A number of ATEC faculty and students are organizing a local party to which you are invited April 13 ! Find details on the map of parties: https://yurisnight.net/events/worldmap-2/   Moon day is being celebrated July 16 in Dallas: http://www.flightmuseum.com/moon-day-2016/

Join us for a special 1-hour behind the scenes animation presentation and Q&A with Disney Artist Lance Summers.  Lane will talk about Disney's new movie Zootopia.

Doors open at 9:30 AM

Robert Fee

Founder - Graduate Program in Design Management

Savannah College of Art and Design

Robert Fee will give a brief presentation on the intent and structure of its curriculum. Started in 2008, it grew to more than 100 students within its first five years, attracting a diverse range of students from all fields of design, engineering, the social sciences, divinity, and the liberal arts due to its cultivation of intellectual development and practice informed by theory, collaboration, and facilitation of creative thinking throughout all levels of an organization.

Robert Fee is professor emeritus at the Savannah College of Art and Design where he was recognized twice by Design Intelligence as one of the Most Admired Industrial Design Educators. In 2007 he founded the Graduate Program in Design Management, a curriculum focused on business and organizational anthropology, collaborative learning, brand analytics, design principles, and business practices. Named by BusinessWeek one of the “World’s Best Design Schools” for teaching design thinking, students conduct scholarly investigation and develop theoretical constructs that contribute to the state-of-the-art of design leadership and management in organizations.

Staging Aliveness with Bio Media: From Living Statues to Genetic Fingerprints and Designer Pigeons

Since the earliest anthropomorphic statues, myths of vivification surround artefacts made by the artist’s hand. The animation of malleable matter stands in a long pictorial tradition, and from the 19th century, the biological metaphor is continued in the discussion of the artwork itself as an organism. By means of form, material or process, a touch of aliveness is staged, aiming at involving the viewer viscerally. Art has imagined, represented and mimicked, then simulated and - quite recently - manipulated living beings and systems for real. After painting, sculpture, automata etc., art in the late 20th century has employed “dry” informatics and robotics to stage aliveness, as well as, since shortly, “wet” cell and molecular biology. Transgenics, Mendelian cross-breeding, the synthesis of DNA sequences, molecular biological imaging media such as gel electrophoresis or DNA chips, cell and tissue engineering, the use of retroviruses and the cloning of bacterial plasmid DNA, belong to the repertoire of a experimental contemporary art that is particularly ‘close to life.’

But which are the adequate media to re/present, simulate or animate biological systems today? This question has provoked a contemporary paragone. In parallel, the democratization of lab tools leads to their appropriation by tinkerers and tactical media activists who apply the critical potential of open source culture from the digital age of Media Art to grassroots DIY biology and biohacking. In this lecture, Jens Hauser will use ‘trans-historical’ provocations to demonstrate how recent artistic practices with biomedia continue art historical attempts to stage ‘aliveness’ and the ‘authentic’, between the technologization of the animate and the animation of the technological.

Jens Hauser is a Copenhagen and Paris based media studies scholar and art curator focusing on the interactions between art and technology. He holds a dual research position at both the Department of Arts and Cultural Studies and at the Medical Museion at the University of Copenhagen, and is a distinguished affiliated faculty member of the Department of Art, Art History and Design at Michigan State University. His curated exhibitions include L’Art Biotech (Nantes, 2003), Still, Living (Perth, 2007), sk-interfaces (Liverpool, 2008/Luxembourg, 2009), the Article Biennale (Stavanger, 2008), Transbiotics (Riga 2010), Fingerprints... (Berlin, 2011/Munich/2012) Synth-ethic (Vienna, 2011), assemble | standard | minimal (Berlin, 2015), SO3 (Belfort, 2015) and Wetware (Los Angeles, 2016). Hauser is also a founding collaborator of the European culture channel ARTE and has produced numerous reportages and radio features.

Chess at UT Dallas and Beyond

James “Jim” Stallings, Director of UT Dallas Chess Program and Zurabi Javakhadze, International Master, and current Freshman in Emerging Media and Communication

We will discuss all aspects of the Chess Program – recruitment, chess competitions, electronic cheating, viewing live games around the world, and preparing for games.  There will be a chess table for a short interactive demo with Zurabi.  The chess table is a large touch screen on wheels.

James “Jim” Stallings became director of the UT Dallas Chess Program in 2006. His current responsibilities include team recruiting, expanding chess in the greater Dallas area and administering the program components: The team, the club and the chess in education initiatives.

He joined the program in 2004 as associate director for chess and education. In this capacity, Stallings’ primary focus was outreach to the local area and state school districts in assisting them with chess instruction to improve their students’ academic performance.

A Dallas native, Stallings has played successfully in Texas and at collegiate chess events. He received his MBA in marketing from DePaul University in Chicago.

We will discuss ways in which engineering and the arts can be co-integrated by exploring the intersection between the two fields. For example, in ATEC there is an interest in Design; however, Engineering also does Design. The same word has similar, but not identical meanings in ATEC vs. Engineering. Exploring both interpretations is interesting and fruitful. In terms of objects of good design or creative art, can we explore these objects with different lenses? We’ll discuss some work performed to achieve “ways of sensing.”

Dr. Paul Fishwick is Distinguished University Chair of Arts, Technology, and Emerging Communication ATEC) and Professor of Computer Science (CS) at the University of Texas at Dallas. His PhD was from the University of Pennsylvania in Computer & Information Science. His research centers on modeling & simulation methodologies, as well as methods to integrate engineering with the arts. He was the Director of Digital Arts and Sciences (DAS) at the University of Florida, where he was faculty until 2012. Prior to his graduate work, Fishwick worked at Newport News Shipbuilding as a  Programmer Analyst and NASA Langley Research Center as Systems Analyst.

Dr. Kamran Kiasaleh received his B.S. (Cum Laude), M.S., and Ph.D. degrees all in Electrical Engineering from the Communications Sciences Institute at the University of Southern California (USC), Los Angeles, CA, in 1981, 1982, and1986, respectively. He is a Full professor in the department of Electrical Engineering at UTD. From Dec. 1996 to Dec. 1997, Dr. Kiasaleh was on a special assignment with the DSP research and development center at Texas Instruments, Inc., Dallas, TX, where he conducted research on various aspects of the 3rd generation wireless communication systems. From Sep. 2000-Jan. 2003, Dr. Kiasaleh was with Optical Crossing, Inc. (OCI) where he launched the development of the state-of-the-art free-space and millimeter-wave communications systems. Dr. Kiasaleh was the recipient of the Research Initiation Award (RIA) from the National Science Foundation (NSF). He was also the recipient of the NASA/ASEE faculty fellowship award at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in 1992 where he participated in the Galileo Optical Experiment (GOPEX) demonstration, the first successful demonstration of an optical communications link involving a deep-space vehicle. For his participation in this project, he received the NASA Group Achievement Award. In 1993, he was the recipient of NASA/ASEE faculty fellowship award at JPL where he participated in Compensated Earth-Moon-Earth Laser Link (CEMERLL) demonstration. He has also been the principle investigator of a grant from the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) for the development of software defines radios (SDR) for emergency responders in US. Dr. Kiasaleh’ s research interests include optical and RF beam propagation through turbulent/unknown media, application of RF technology in cancer detection, tissue optics, synchronization, SDR, and optical communication systems.

Marcus Neustetter is an artist and cultural activist in Johannesburg South Africa with a focus on his art practice at the intersections of art, science and technology. His cross-disciplinary practice moves between the gallery and the virtual domain to public space with site-specific and socially engaged interventions.

www.marcusneustetter.com                

http://www.wtn.net/summit-2015/world-technology-awards-winners

In the past years Neustetter's collaboration with the South African Sumbandila Satellite, the building of a Rocket Factory and Structures of Observation at the South African Astronomical Observatory has been as much about collaborating with scientists and producing cross-disciplinary works as it has been about understanding his own context in South Africa. The result is a journey of local stories and community questions that try to link the scientific pursuit and artistic practice through socially engaged processes. 

Thomas Riccio is a Professor of Performance and Aesthetic Studies at UT Dallas. Prof. Riccio worked extensively in the area of indigenous performance, ritual, and shamanism, creating performances and/or conducting fieldwork in South Africa, Zambia, Kenya, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Tanzania, Russia, Republic of Sakha (Siberia), Korea, China, Vietnam, and Alaska. He was the Lead Narrative Engineer for Hanson Robotics, co-authoring several robot personalities and is the director of the Dead White Zombies, a Dallas-based performance group.

The Indigenous worldview performance is derived from a specific place creating a Community of Place. A place shared by humans, animals, the elements, climate, spirits, and ancestors; everything has life and agency the wind, rocks, a word, and even a thought. Humans, being the most physically advantaged, and conscious have the greatest responsibility to maintain place. Indigenous performance the primary way of doing so and is seen as a technology, a practical and tactile event that serves as a model as it enables the direct, psychological, emotional, and physical interaction with place. The challenge in our historical moment, an era is that is more aware of the global, and our immediate place is how and what kind of planetary culture are we creating? How do we perform a new consciousness into existence? We are all becoming indigenous again: earthlings.

http://www.thomasriccio.com/

Join EMAC undergraduate and graduate students as they present their capstone projects.  This event is a great opportunity to get a sense of the diversity of EMAC.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1089482824425762/

 

Ruth West and students from University of North Texas Art + Science lab's studio will share their experiences on the journey to blending the arts and sciences. Aaron Davis is an undergraduate history major working on research in how architecture facilitates our understanding of the environment and sustainability. Amelia Jaycen is a journalism graduate student exploring interdisciplinary science communication, energy reporting, and researching the mapping of shared metaphors between the media at-large and information and communication infrastructures. Bobby Nash is a radio, television and film production undergraduate student working on a documentary short exploring the nature of reality in virtual reality. They will share about their research and creative work in order to spark a dialogue with our colleagues at the UT Dallas ATEC Watering Hole about the challenges and opportunities inherent in blending research and creative practice. 

Gaspard and Sandra Bébié-Valérian compose the entity Art-Act.  They are artists in residence at UTD CentralTrak

http://art-act.fr/en/bio/

Their approach is based on a logic of reusing the technologies (detournement, hijack), interfacing lowtech with objects but also the activation of social, ecological and political issues.

Most of their work is  interactive and questions the possibility of a re-appropriation of technologies for a critical thinking of the world.  They seek to live the day-to-day beyond the preconceived, the premade by claiming autodetermination in a creative and re-creative élan.

The project they are developing at CentralTrak, What is Rising  is an installation project based on the earthquake idea, extended to tsunami, accident, radical transformation of a place, an environment.­

David E. Levy, M.D.

Novel Approaches to Clinical Studies

Over several decades as a clinical neurologist, Dr. Levy was exposed to strengths and weaknesses of typical clinical studies.  In particular, in developing decision trees to aid predicting outcome from nontraumatic coma, he was among the first to take advantage of the ability of recursive partitioning (aka CART) to assign different weights to different misclassification errors.  More recently, the introduction of wide-spread electronic health records has raised the possibility of taking near-contemporary “historical” controls from big data to judge the effectiveness of potential new therapeutic interventions.  This talk will elaborate on both of these.  Suggestions will most definitely be welcome.

Bio:  Dr. Levy attended Harvard College and Harvard Medical School and obtained his neurological training at New York Hospital – Cornell Medical Center under Fred Plum and Jerome Posner. Initially, he spent about 20 years in academics, during which time he conducted both experimental and clinical stroke studies and explored prediction algorithms for nontraumatic coma and stroke. He was the first to administer t-PA to an acute stroke patient in an NIH study.  Retaining his academic appointment, he then shifted his focus to industry, where he continued to design and conduct randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trials of potential acute stroke treatments.  

Ewen Chardronnet

Mojave Epiphany

Chardronnet will talk about his project Mojave Epiphany

http://ifmapp.institutfrancais.com/residences/#f2_8871

He is retracing the footsteps of rocketry pioneers in California to produce multimedia installations and a book exploring the ethical, political and artistic communities in southern California in the 1940s and 50s.

Ewen Chardronnet is an author, multimedia and experimental artist and curator based in Paris and Porto. He has been engaged in various collaborative art & research works such as Makrolab, The Laboratory Planet or World-Information.Org. He published in 2001 "Quitter la Gravité," the French anthology on the Association of Autonomous Astronauts and performed a zero-gravity flight in this context. In 2003, he received the Leonardo New Horizons Award for his work with the Acoustic Space Lab project around the conversion of a former soviet giant radio telescope in Latvia. He has recently published books on the Fab Lab movement.

He’s involved in several performance-art projects with Soopa records, Les Echappés / Los Escapados collective and other performances with artists and musicians. His more recent artistic project is "Bangalore: a subjective cartography," an online mapping project developed with Benjamin Cadon that explores the city of Bangalore (India) through various subjective methods (electromagnetic waves sensors, sound & images and psycho-geographical studies), presented at the European Month of Photography 2010-2011.

Chardronnet's blog: http://semaphore.blogs.com/

Chirag Gupta

Hackstorming in Dallas: Optimizing Collaborative Team Meetings

Abstract: Hackstorming refers to a unique style of group collaboration which is a combination of a brainstorm and a hackathon.

Abstract: https:[email protected]/hackstorming-92c575d684b7

Chirag is a serial entrepreneur and the founder of North Dallas NoD Coworking https:[email protected][email protected]76e

Yuri Malina

Why Undergraduate Students don’t have to quit school to entrepreneur

Co-founder of Design for America, a nation-wide initiative to spur local social innovations among college students.

http://designforamerica.com/

Also co-founder and Chief Product Officer of SwipeSense, a venture backed start-up which aims to eliminate Hospital-Acquired Infections, https://www.swipesense.com/

Dhruba Deb, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Researcher

Hamon Center for Therapeutic Oncology Research University of Texas

Southwestern Medical Center Dallas, TX

Scientist-by-day and artist-at-night, Dhruba Deb is interested in understanding the unpredictability of cancer and its therapeutic implications. During the day, he works as a post doctoral researcher on lung cancer at UT Southwestern Medical Center. During the evenings and weekends, he works on art projects towards a BA visual art degree at University of Herdfordshire.

Dhru's current obsession is growing his "Cancer ART-SCI Network" connecting cancer research, art and business in Dallas and New York City. This network connects para-disciplinary sci-artists who are interested in and can contribute to both cancer research and art.

 

Maryam Baig

Artist and Performer

Barlow, Borremans, and Talbot Walk into Dallas, TX and Find a Tollroad!

Maryam will be examining how Dallas is being branded as Big D when it comes to marketing, while the citizens of Dallas have not caught up with the brand yet (and why.)

Born and raised in Pakistan, she received a B.A in Art and Performance and an MFA in Arts and Technology at University of Texas at Dallas. While her academic endeavors span across several fields of expression, visual and performing arts, writing, poetry, her studies have found their focus on Gesture, Memory and Performance in Storytelling.

Baig is a 2014-15 D Academy fellow and an active team member for Big D Reads initiative. Recently, Baig has been invited to perform her writings and short stories at different venues around Dallas, such as Ignite DFW, The Naked Stage and Margo Jones Theatre at Magnolia Lounge.

Kim Bernard

Artist-in-Residence - Physics Department

Harvard University

Kim Bernard:  An Artist Walks into the Physics Department…  Bernard will present a lively and engaging talk about how she came to be the first artist-in-residence in the Harvard Physics Department, the collaborative projects she has initiated and how her kinetic sculpture continues to evolve as a result of being surrounded by physicists. 

Kim Bernard is currently an Artist-in-Residence in the Physics Department at Harvard University and   exhibits her science inspired kinetic sculpture, installations and encaustic works nationally.  Her work has been reviewed in the Boston Globe, Art News and Art New England.  She is the recipient of the Piscataqua Region Artist Advancement Grant, NEFA Grant and several Maine Arts Commission Grants. She received her BFA from Parsons in 1987 and her MFA from Mass Art in 2010.  Bernard gives public lectures and offers workshops nationally as a visiting artist.

"It’s fascinating that there are predictable patterns in matter and motion.  I’m interested in creating work that demonstrates this phenomena simply, with an aesthetic that allows the viewer easy access, and provides a tangible way of seeing physics."

Robyn Brown

BoldIdea.org

Tech for Social Good: How Might We Apply Computational Thinking to

Community Problem Solving?

Robyn will present on code as a tool to address future problems in our community and the world, as well as the role of social impact in computer science education. She will share the components of ideaSpark, Bold Idea’s new after-school program that combines education in coding, computer science and social impact

Robyn Brown is the President and a Co-Founder of Bold Idea, a Dallas-based non-profit that mentors students to make an impact in their community using code. She is responsible for business and program development, volunteer management and the organization’s communications to new stakeholders. Robyn has over 10 years of experience in marketing communications for companies in the technology and energy industries, as well as tech startups and non-profit organizations. She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Journalism from the University of North Texas.

 

Collin Steinmetz

Sales & Marketing, ilumi

The Lumen Life - Reexamining the Relationship Between People and Lighting

Collin Steinmetz is a recent UT Dallas Alumni (Bus. Admin/Marketing/Economics, '14) with a knack for problem solving. As a fresh graduate, he craved an opportunity that would allow him to escape the monotony often associated with a 'desk job'. As fate would have it, an opportunity at Plano-based ilumi solutions (startup founded by two UT Dallas MBA grads) presented itself a month after graduation where Collin currently works in sales and marketing to facilitate and support the company's rapid growth. 

Light is a powerful force that often seems to fall into the background of our day-to-day lives. It tells us when to wake and when to sleep. It creates atmosphere and mood. It gives focus and function. It entertains and envelops. So why is control of lighting normally limited to on and off? As both the LED lighting and the connect home industries continue to see exponential growth, we find it increasingly important to examine how people interact with light, how light interacts with them, and what can be done to change how people think about an ordinary item in an extraordinary way.