Graduate Courses in Literary Studies

Specific Course Descriptions by Semester

Course Lookup is the University's semester-by-semester guide to finding classes using a customized search. Consult it for general scheduling. Not all courses are taught each semester.

Courses available to MA and PhD students

HUSL 6304 Studies in Literary Themes (3 semester hours) Examinations of specific themes as they appear in various literary works and traditions. Themes considered in courses may include love, heroism, feminism, the anti-hero, or revolution. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T

HUSL 6308 Studies in Literary Forms and Genres (3 semester hours) Studies in various literary genres, either individually or in relation to each other. Among topics considered will be the difficulties of defining genres, the nature of specific genres, their historical and aesthetic development, and their artistic possibilities. Genres for discussion may include tragedy, comedy, the novel, and various forms of poetic expression. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) Y

HUSL 6309 Literary Movements (3 semester hours) Studies in the nature of intellectual and artistic movements, with emphasis on how they affect literary expression. Examples of such movements are romanticism, naturalism, modernism, and postmodernism. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours). (3-0) Y

HUSL 6310 Studies in Literary Interpretation (3 semester hours) Study of the issues involved in the attempt to interpret dramatic, poetic, and fictional texts. Emphasis will be placed on the writing of interpretive essays and on the exploration of how various cultural and intellectual perspectives as well as different theoretical stances affect the reading of a specific text. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) T

HUSL 6312 Major Authors (3 semester hours) Study of one or more major literary figures, such as Dante, Chaucer, Milton, Cervantes, Goethe, Austen, Blake, Balzac, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Mann, Eliot, Pound, Woolf, Faulkner, Paz or Borges. (May be repeated for credit as subjects vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) Y

HUSL 6313 Shakespeare (3 semester hours) Study of the dramatic and/or poetic writings of William Shakespeare. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) T

HUSL 6314 Jane Austen and Her Time (3 semester hours) Study of the writings of Jane Austen and the ways in which her work engages the political and social issues of her day. (3-0) T

HUSL 6315 Literary Theory (3 semester hours) Consideration of major literary theories, such as new criticism, deconstruction, gender studies, and chaos theory, with emphasis on how these theories influence and modify the interpretation of literary and other artistic texts. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) T

HUSL 6330 Studies in Literature and the Other Arts (3 semester hours) An examination of the links between literature and music, the visual arts, film, theater, and/or dance. Topics and approaches will vary but may include, for example, the fantastic in literature and visual arts, structures in literature and music, adaptations of novels into film, and the pastoral in literature and the visual arts. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T

HUSL 6340 Literature Before 1800 (3 semester hours) Studies in the literature and culture of selected periods in the Western tradition. May focus on ancient, medieval, or early modern periods. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 hours) (3-0) T

HUSL 6345 Early American Literature (3 semester hours) Study of literary works written in and about America from the early 1500s to 1800. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) T

HUSL 6350 Literature of the Nineteenth Century (3 semester hours) Studies in the literature and culture of the nineteenth century. May focus on British, European, American, Latin American, or Asian contexts. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 hours) (3-0) T

HUSL 6355 Literature, Science, and Culture (3 semester hours) Seminar emphasizing the treatment in literature of scientific concepts (e.g., relativity, evolution) and technological developments (e.g., computers, virtual reality) of particular importance. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) T

HUSL 6360 Literature of the Twentieth Century (3 semester hours) Studies in the literature and culture of the twentieth century. May focus on British, European, American, Latin American, or Asian contexts. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 hours) (3-0) T

HUSL 6370 Studies in Literature and Ideas (3 semester hours) Studies of the relationship between selected literary texts and major ideas in philosophy, science, and politics. The course will examine systems of thoughts as they are incorporated, delineated, and explored in literature. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) T

HUSL 6372 Literature and Society (3 semester hours) Seminar studying the values and concerns of various social groups through a study of literary texts, including consideration of the role of literature and the writer in given societies.(May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T

HUSL 6373 Topics in Latin American Literature (3 semester hours) Studies in the literatures and cultures of Latin America. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T

HUSL 6374 Modern Jewish Literature Across Cultures (3 semester hours) Study of modern Jewish literatures in multiple national contexts and languages, with emphasis on the interaction between modernity and vision of Jewish identities and traditions. (3-0) T

HUSL 6375 German Literature and Ideas 1870-1960 (3 semester hours) Study of the range and diversity of German-Austrian literature and thought from the end of the nineteenth century through the 1960s. (3-0) T

HUSL 6376 Literature of Weimar Germany (3 semester hours) Study of literature written during the Weimar Republic (1918-1933) with attention to formative influences on and cultural-political forces shaping the artistic imagination. (3-0) T

HUSL 6378 Literature and the Holocaust (3 semester hours) Seminar considering both major literary works (novels, short stories, and poems) written under the impact of the Holocaust as well as literary theories responding to these texts. Some emphasis placed on films and other works of visual art. (3-0) T

HUSL 6380 The Art and Craft of Translation (3 semester hours) Workshop designed to provide students with a model not only of literary interpretation but also of an interdisciplinary approach through the act of translating that can be applied to a wide range of texts and issues. Emphasis is on the actual translation of literary texts from another language into English. Issues involved in this process will form the basis of the workshop's theoretical component. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) S

HUSL 6381 Critical Approaches to Translation (3 semester hours) The study of the various approaches to the history, theory, and criticism of literary and humanistic translation. Topics may include the translator's working methods, interviews with translators, multiple translations, the changing nature of interpretive approaches, theoretical models of translation, and criteria for the evaluation of translations. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) T

HUSL 6383 Teaching First-Year Writing (3 semester hours) Covers both the methods of teaching first-year writing and pedagogical theories of modern composition. Enrollment required for teaching assistants assigned to sections of Rhetoric 1302, but not limited to such students. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 hours.) (3-0) Y

HUSL 6384 Digital and Visual Rhetorics (3 semester hours) Covers a wide range of topics addressing the study of visual rhetoric as well as rhetoric in digital environments. Course also emphasizes the relationship of digital and visual rhetorics to media ecology/media studies as well as the implications of these rhetorics for composition pedagogy. (3-0) T

HUSL 6385 Rhetorical Theory (3 semester hours) A historical survey of Western rhetorical theory focusing on major figures in rhetoric. (3-0) T

HUSL 6386 Special Topics in Rhetoric (3 semester hours) A seminar in the study of rhetoric. May include one or more topics such as ethos, histories of rhetoric, the rhetoric of technology and science, the Sophists, rhetoric as epistemic, key figures in rhetoric (e.g., Burke, Foucault, Baudrillard, Spivak, etc.). (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) R

HUSL 6388 The Nature of Language (3 semester hours) An inquiry into the nature, origins, and evolution of language, the relationship of language to thought and to creativity, language as a social tool, and nonverbal patterns of communication. Survey of linguistic theory and method applicable to the study of the phonological, morphological, lexical, semantic, and syntactic levels of language. (3-0) T

HUSL 6389 Applied Linguistics (3 semester hours) Techniques for comparing two or more languages. The study of traditional and modern theories and practices of language learning and teaching. (3-0) T

HUSL 6390 Theory and Practice in Literary Studies (3 semester hours) Group projects integrating the interpretation of literary texts or themes with experiments in creative writing and performance. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T

HUSL 6392 Topics in Literary Studies (3 semester hours) The study of themes, genres, authors, and/or movements in literature. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) R

HUSL 6393 Independent Readings in Literary Studies (3 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit.) (3-0) R

HUSL 6394 Independent Research in Literary Studies (3 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit.) (3-0) R

HUSL 6395 Special Topics in Literary Studies (3 semester hours) Independent studies course that may count toward minimum course requirements for the M.A. degree. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 hours.) (3-0) R

HUSL 6396 Spanish Language, Literature, and Culture (3 semester hours) Studies in the language, various literary movements, or the general cultures of Spanish-speaking peoples in Europe or Latin America. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) R

HUSL 6398 World Literatures (3 semester hours) Studies in literatures from specific regions, ethnic groups, and nationalities within and outside the United States. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T

HUSL 6399 Studies in Asian Literature (3 semester hours) Studies in the literature and cultures of Asia. Topics may include Zen/Chan History, Thought, and Poetry; Confucianism; and the I-Ching (Book of Changes). (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours) (3-0) T

Courses available to PhD students only

HUSL 7308 Advanced Studies in Literary Forms and Genres (3 semester hours) Advanced studies in various literary genres, either individually or in relation to each other. Topics considered may include the difficulties of defining genres, the nature of specific genres, their historical and aesthetic development, and their artistic possibilities. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T

HUSL 7309 Advanced Studies in Literary Movements (3 semester hours) Advanced studies in the nature of intellectual and artistic movements, with emphasis on how they affect literary expression. Examples of such movements are romanticism, naturalism, modernism, and postmodernism. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours). (3-0) R

HUSL 7322 Advanced Translation Workshop (3 semester hours) An intensive investigation in a workshop environment of the aesthetics of the art and craft of literary translation focusing on the techniques and processes involved in producing English translations of poetic, dramatic, fictional, and essayistic works. Students are expected to produce publishable translations primarily of works by contemporary international writers. Discussions will include the history and theory of literary translation. Permission of the instructor or previous completion of HUSL 6380 required. (3-0) R

HUSL 7350 Advanced Studies in Nineteenth Century Literature (3 semester hours) Advanced studies in the literature and culture of the nineteenth century. May focus on British, European, American, Asian, or Latin American contexts. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 hours) (3-0) T

HUSL 7360 Advanced Studies in Twentieth Century Literature (3 semester hours) Advanced studies in the literature and culture of the twentieth century. May focus on British, European, American, Asian, or Latin American contexts. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 hours) (3-0) T

HUSL 7370 Advanced Studies in Literature and History (3 semester hours) Studies of selected literary texts and art movements in times of high political tension (American Revolution, Civil War, Weimar Germany, etc.) (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) R

HUSL 7372 Advanced Studies in Literature and Society (3 semester hours) Advanced studies of the values and concerns of various social groups through the analysis of literary texts, including consideration of the role of literature and the writer in given societies. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) R

HUSL 7390 Advanced Special Topics in Literary Studies (3 semester hours) Independent studies course that may count toward minimum course requirements for the Ph.D. degree. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 hours.) (3-0) R

HUSL 7391 Special Topics in Translation Studies (3 semester hours) The investigation of the field of Translation Studies. Topics may include the anthropological foundation of translation; the study of crossing cultural barriers; translation methodologies as a model for interdisciplinary research; communication as translation; translation and reading; historical aspects of translation; models of cultural differences; critical approaches to the theories of translation from the Greeks to the present; and specific research and translation projects. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 hours.) (3-0) R

HUSL 8303 Independent Readings in Literary Studies (3 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit.) (3-0)R

HUSL 8305 Independent Research in Literary Studies (3 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit.) (3-0)R