Dr. Nicholas R. Gans

 

I am an Assistant Professor with the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Texas at Dallas.

My research interests are in controls in robotics.  I have a focus on vision-based estimation and control for robots and autonomous vehicles.  Naturally, my research includes computer vision and nonlinear control. 

I am currently updating this web page, and I welcome any feedback (or errors!)

My recent research includes:
•How robots can pass information back to human users about their understanding of the environment
•Treating visual search problems as optimization problems, with the robots "self-optimizing" their location to find targets
•Using kinematic models of the human body, along with multiple small sensors worn on the body, to estimate human walking motion
•Visual odometry and motion estimation for mobile robots

Nicholas Gans 
Email: ngans@utdallas.edu
 
Mailing Address:
Department of Electrical Engineering
Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and  Computer Science
The University of Texas at Dallas
MS EC 33, P.O. Box 830688
Richardson, TX 75083
 
Office Address:
Engineering and Computer Science Building Room 4.910
The University of Texas at Dallas
2601 North Floyd Road
Richardson, TX 75083

 

Phone:

972-883-4341

 

Updated 4/30/2012

I was interviewed on the Dallas Public Radio show Think with Krys Boyd, on November 14, 2011.
You can listen to it here.

I gave this talk as part of the workshop Recent Advances in Extremum Seeking Control and its Applications at the 19th IFAC Wordl Congress in Cape Town, South Africa, in August, 2014.


I gave this talk as the keynote session at the 2011 International Symposium of the Pattern Recognition Association of South Africa in Vaal, South Africa. Select "View Full-Size Presentation" to see the videos on YouTube.
 
I gave this talk at as part of the "Technology on Tap" Lecture Series at Trinity Hall Irish Pub in June 2011. It starts with a general discussion on robotics, then discusses some new work by my lab group.


This is a slightly dated presentation of my research, including videos